Department of Philosophy

Comal Building Room 102
T: 512.245.2285 F: 512.245.8335
www.txstate.edu/philosophy

Philosophy raises some of the most fundamental questions about our world and ourselves-questions about the nature of reality, knowledge, morality, God, and society. Students of philosophy study the thinking of major philosophers on such matters and learn to think critically and clearly on their own. Our small classes cultivate student-faculty mentoring, research and learning. Our faculty - professional philosophers, authors and leaders in the field - work one-on-one with students, encouraging independent research and professional preparation. And our co-curricular activities and organizations build strong rapport and camaraderie between our students. By fostering a love of learning, an appreciation of the value of critical and reflective thinking, and a collaborative intellectual community; we help prepare our students to become engaged, reflective citizens and lifelong learners while preparing them for graduate study or careers in government, law, the non-profit sector, business, or education.

Since philosophy is the home of the study of logic and the principles of good argumentation, it lends itself well to being joined with virtually any course of study. Philosophy students are highly valued for their communication skills, their ability to make ethical decisions and their adaptability in new situations. Through the study of philosophy, we learn how to explain why we know what we know and believe what we believe. Not only does this ability make us stand out as citizens and leaders, it also helps us navigate life's choices and better understand our world.

Some philosophy majors pursue careers in business, journalism, law, medicine, and education. In these cases students recognize that the successful practitioner is the good thinker and turn to philosophy to develop their critical and creative powers. Other majors develop an interest in becoming professional philosophers and enroll in some of the nation’s best graduate programs in philosophy.

For those students with special interests in a particular area, the department offers the following recommendations:

Pre-Professional Study of Philosophy

Students interested in pursuing graduate work in philosophy are advised to take:

PHIL 3320Ethics3
PHIL 3340Symbolic Logic3
PHIL 4356Philosophical Theory of Knowledge3
PHIL 4370Metaphysics3

They should also develop a language proficiency in Spanish, French or German.

Pre-Law

All pre-law students should consider an undergraduate major in philosophy, given the importance that both philosophy and law attach to analysis, argumentation, and the evaluation of evidence. Pre-law students should also consider taking the following electives:

PHIL 2330Elementary Logic3
PHIL 3320Ethics3
PHIL 3322Professional Ethics3
PHIL 3323Environmental Ethics3
PHIL 3331Philosophy of Law3
PHIL 3332Social and Political Philosophy3

Pre-Professional Study of Religion

A minor in religious studies is appropriate for various professional plans, including education, journalism, the arts, ministry, and graduate work in religious studies and other humanities and social sciences. Students interested in graduate work in religious studies should combine the minor with a major appropriate to their plans and interests.

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

Minors

Subjects in this department include: PHIL, REL


Courses in Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 1305. Philosophy and Critical Thinking.

A study of universal philosophical problems and their solutions with a view toward developing clear thinking about knowledge, belief, and value. Approximately one half of this course will focus on the student’s critical thinking skills. Credit cannot be given for both PHIL 1305 and PHIL 3301. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Lang, Phil & Culture Core 040|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
TCCN: PHIL 1301

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PHIL 1320. Ethics and Society.

Study of ethics, its recent focus on social problems, and new fields of inquiry, including environmental ethics, ethics in business, professions, technology and sport. Also such global issues as poverty, minority rights, and stem cell research. Emphasis on development and application of principles of critical thinking and moral reasoning. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Lang, Phil & Culture Core 040|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
TCCN: PHIL 2306

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PHIL 1330. Critical Thinking.

Study of informal fallacies, valid argument forms, problem solving strategies, language clarification, and application of analytic skills.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 2311. History of Philosophy Before 1600.

Early Greek, Roman, and medieval systems of thought. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
TCCN: PHIL 2316

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PHIL 2312. History of Philosophy Since 1600.

Modern philosophical thought through the 19th century. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
TCCN: PHIL 2317

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PHIL 2330. Elementary Logic.

A study of the nature and forms of correct reasoning, both deductive and inductive.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
TCCN: PHIL 2303

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PHIL 3301. Philosophical Issues.

The great philosophical concepts that have challenged the best thoughts of people and have contributed to the fulfillment of the good life. Emphasis upon the applicability of those concepts to human life in our time and to the development of intellectual perspective. Approximately one half of this course will focus on the student’s critical thinking skills. Credit cannot be given for both PHIL 3301 and PHIL 1305. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 3314. American Philosophy.

Examination of contributions of Americans to perennial philosophical issues. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 3315. Contemporary Philosophy.

Selected readings in late 19th and 20th century philosophy: existentialism, positivism, analytic philosophy, phenomenology, and pragmatism. Prerequisite: 3 hours of lower division PHIL, PHIL 3301, or consent of instructor. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 3316. Existentialism and Phenomenology.

A study of the nature of human experience and existence in the philosophies of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, and Camus. Topics will include freedom, dread, emotion, death, other minds, faith, and the past as experienced by the individual. Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 3317. Science and Religion.

An examination of modern science and Western religion, and an analysis of the issues and ideas involved in the relationships between them. Prerequisites: 3 hours of lower division PHIL, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 3318. Reason, God and Nature.

An analysis of the concept of God, terms predicated on God, and theological propositions. An attempt to determine the nature of religious utterances in comparison with those of everyday life, scientific discovery, morality, and imaginative expression. Prerequisite: 3 hours of lower division PHIL, PHIL 3301, or consent of instructor. (Capstone) (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 3320. Ethics.

A study of classical and contemporary philosophical inquiries into our knowledge of the “good” and the grounds of moral obligation. May be repeated once for additional credit. (Capstone) Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division PHIL, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 3321. Contemporary Moral Problems.

Contemporary Moral Problems. (3-0) Exploration of philosophical dimensions of contemporary moral problems such as abortion, euthanasia, poverty, animal rights, nuclear war, and privacy in a computer age. Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor. May be repeated once for additional credit. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 3322. Professional Ethics.

Study of major topics in business and professional ethics, including what a profession is, whether it differs from business, and what is involved with the moral education, social responsibilities, and ethical standards of professionals and business people. Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor. (Capstone) (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 3323. Environmental Ethics.

Study of ethical issues associated with the environment including nature, use, preservation, and restoration of the environment.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 3324. Meaning of Life.

Investigation of major theories of the meaning of life in Western and Eastern philosophies. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 3325. Philosophy of Sex and Love.

Critical survey of major thinking on sex and love from ancient to modern times. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 3326. Philosophy and Sport.

Examines philosophical issues in sport, including the social significance of sport, ethical issues, gender equity, sport and race, mind and body in sport, aesthetics, sport and self-knowledge, and the connection of sport and philosophy. Prerequisite: 3 hours of lower division PHIL, PHIL 3301, or consent of instructor. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 3331. Philosophy of Law.

The major theses which have been set forth in the history of jurisprudence including foundations of law, natural law, legal positivism, and the judicial process. (Capstone) (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 3332. Social and Political Philosophy.

Critical examination of major theories concerning the organization of societies and governments. Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor. (Capstone) (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 3333. Feminist Theory.

This course will examine major feminist theories including liberal feminism, Marxist feminism, radical feminism, and post-modernist feminism with an eye especially to revealing the complexity and diversity of contemporary feminist thought. Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, WS 3376 or WS 3377, or permission of the instructor. (MULT) (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Multicultural Content|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 3340. Symbolic Logic.

Study of the logic of propositions through prepositional calculi, formal proofs, and first-order functional calculi. Also included is an investigation into the axiomatic method as used in logic and mathematics, including the concepts of completeness and consistency. Prerequisite: PHIL 2330, or MATH 2372, or consent of instructor.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 3351. Philosophy and Literature.

The course explores the relation between philosophy and literature. Prerequisite: Three hours lower division PHIL, PHIL 3301, or consent of instructor. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4301. Applied Philosophy.

Practical application of methods and teaching of philosophy to religion, science, morality, politics, art, or literature. The study of one or more of these areas will demonstrate how philosophy contributes to the identification of issues as well as their resolution. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 3 hours of lower division PHIL, PHIL 3301, or consent of instructor. (Capstone) (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4302. Dialogue.

Study of literature about the nature, purpose, and significance of dialogue along with active participation in the dialogues of the Department of Philosophy’s Dialogue Series. Prerequisite: PHIL 1305 or permission of the instructor. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4303. Philosophy of Technology.

Study of philosophical and ethical dimensions of technology including the nature of technology and technological progress, the relation of humans to the technological environment, whether technology is value-laden, and the social character of technology. Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4327. Bioethics.

In this course students will study ethical issues, dilemmas, codes of conduct, and social responsibilities of health care professionals and bioresearchers. Additionally, students will critically examine issues of ethics and justice in healthcare systems, clinical practice, and biotechnology. Prerequisite: PHIL 1305 or PHIL 1320. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4350. Philosophy of the Arts.

A critical and historical analysis of the nature of aesthetic experience and creative genius. Prerequisite: three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor. (Capstone) (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4351. Philosophy of Education.

Study of major philosophical theories on nature, values, and purpose of education. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4355. Philosophical Theory of Science.

Study of the major theories concerning the nature and value of science and the scientific method. Repeatable for credit with different emphasis. Prerequisite: 3 hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of instructor. (Capstone) (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4356. Philosophical Theory of Knowledge.

A study of the major theories concerning knowledge, belief, certainty, and perception. Repeatable for credit with different emphasis. Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4360A. Ethics and Dementia.

This course provides an opportunity to examine ethical challenges posed by dementia for those with dementia, family members, caregivers, healthcare systems, policy makers, and others. Participants will critically explore ethics and dementia in clinical, social/cultural, everyday life, policy, end-of-life, and individual perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 1305 or PHIL 1320.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4360B. Moral Psychology.

This course provides an introduction to the major theories, issues, and research relevant to the field of moral psychology. Drawing from a variety of fields—philosophy, social psychology, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, and evolutionary theory—we will investigate what morality is, how it develops, and how it functions in society. Prerequisite: PHIL 1305 or 1320.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4360C. Philosophy, Nonviolence, Sustainability, and Social Change.

In this course students will study themes and concepts related to nonviolence, sustainability, and social change. Participants will critically examine the works of thinkers such as Thoreau, Addams, Tolstoy, Gandhi, King, and Chavez.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4361A. Philosophy of Biology.

In this course students will explore foundational questions in biology concerning the justification of biological theories, methods and concepts. Possible topics include concepts of fitness, units of selection, adaptationism, species, phylogenetic inference, homology, developmental systems, neuroscience, behavioral evolution, cooperation, altruism, evolutionary psychology, evolutionary ethics, cultural evolution, and race and gender. Prerequisite: PHIL 1305 or 1320.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4361B. Philosophy of the Human Sciences.

This course is a survey of current debates about the structure, nature, role, methodologies, scope, and aim of the human sciences. Prerequisite: Phil 1305 or 1320.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4361C. Philosophy of Emotion.

In this course students examine the understandings of emotions as developed in the history of philosophy, including topics such as somatic theories, cognitive theories, and philosophical accounts of feelings, mood, and other affective experiences. Prerequisite: PHIL 1305 or 1320.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4362A. History of Analytic Philosophy.

Students in this course will examine major thinkers, works, theories, and problems of analytic philosophy. Topics will include the philosophy of language, logic, philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of mind, philosophy of science, metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, metaethics, and philosophical methodology. Prerequisite: PHIL 1305 or PHIL 1320.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4362B. 19th-Century Philosophy.

This course offers a detailed introduction to central figures of 19th-century European philosophy such as Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche in the context of their responses to the Enlightenment, the condition of modernity, the growth of democracy, nationalism, capitalism, Darwin, secularization, and the critical project of Kant. Prerequisite: PHIL 1305 or 1320.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4363A. Philosophy and Science Fiction.

In this course students will examine intersections between philosophy and science fiction around topics such as the nature of reality, the existence and nature of the divine, the limits of human knowledge, the meaning of free will, the notions of personhood, the nature of morality, and the meaning of life. Prerequisite: PHIL 1305 or 1320.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4370. Metaphysics.

Systematic study of metaphysical problems by examination of classical and modern texts. Topics considered will involve being and unity, mind and matter, God, causation and necessity, free will and determinism. Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4371. Asian Philosophy.

The course covers mainly Chinese and Indian philosophy, such as Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism. How do people in the orient look at the meanings of life, the nature of the world and their place in the world? This course shall shed light on these issues. May be repeated for credit. (MULT) (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Multicultural Content|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4372. Latin American Philosophy.

Study of ancient Latin American thought, including Mayan, Aztec, Toltec, and Incan, pre- and post conquest Latin American philosophy, contemporary Latin American philosophy, and the thinking of Latin Americans in the U.S. Prerequisite: PHIL 1305 or permission of the instructor. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4373. Themes in Africana Philosophy.

In this course students will examine philosophy and philosophical practice as it emerges from the historical experiences of African Americans and the African Diaspora. Participants in the course will evaluate how the African-American philosophical tradition alters conventional philosophical accounts of subjectivity, knowledge, time, language, history, embodiment, memory, and justice. Prerequisite: Phil 1305 or 1320.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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PHIL 4388. Problems in Philosophy.

Independent study of specific problems in philosophy. Open to students on an individual or small group basis by arrangement with the Department of Philosophy. Problem area, bibliography, and study paper outline are to be approved by the instructor. Prerequisite: Three hours of lower division philosophy, PHIL 3301, or consent of the instructor. May be repeated once for additional credit.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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Courses in Religion (REL)

REL 1300. World Religions.

This course will be a survey and comparative study of the major religions of the world including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and the Indigenous Religions. Recommended as an entry course for religion minors.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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REL 2310. Introduction to the Hebrew Bible.

An introduction to the contemporary academic study of the Hebrew Bible (“Old Testament”) and related Near Eastern and Second Temple Jewish literature. Representative texts will be examined using the historical and literary methods of scholarship.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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REL 2315. Introduction to the New Testament.

An introduction to the contemporary academic study of the New Testament, including apocryphal and post-canonical works. Representative texts will be examined using the historical and literary methods of scholarship.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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REL 2321. Founders, Prophets and Saints.

Critical analysis of the life, works, and thought of a major religious figure, e.g., Jesus, Paul, Luther, St. Teresa, Maimonides, the Baal Shem Tov, Mohammad, al-Ghazzali, Rumi, Buddha, Gandhi. May be repeated for credit. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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REL 2350. Mediterranean and European Religions.

This course is a survey of religions that originated in the Near East, Mediterranean, and Europe, with emphasis on the ancient to medieval periods. The course includes Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, in the contexts of Egyptian, Persian, Greco-Roman, and old European traditions.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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REL 2360. Asian Religious Traditions.

This course is a survey of the major religious traditions originating in Asia: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and others. Basic doctrines and practices will be covered in an historical framework. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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REL 3330. Religious Controversy in America.

Students in this course will analyze religious controversies and crises in America from the colonies to the present in order to interpret the role of religion in American history, culture, law, and politics. Topics include the Salem Witch Trials, the Jim Jones massacre, and Ten Commandments monuments on government propoerty. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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REL 3335. Cults and New Religious Movements.

This course will investigate New Religious Movements (NRMs) primarily within the contemporary American context. Controversial and emerging religions can be approached from many angles. Accordingly, the course will introduce students to a variety of theoretical perspectives and approaches for studying NRMs. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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REL 3340. Religion, Literature, and the Arts.

The course features a thematic selection of literary and artistic works in order to examine the connections and disconnections between the aesthetic and religious aspects of human culture. May be taken twice for credit with different topics. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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REL 3342. The Homeric Epic: The Illiad and the Odyssey.

A close reading of the Iliad and the Odyssey in English translation, with emphasis on philosophical and religious issues. Prominent topics include the gods, religious rituals, heroic ethics, and the human condition. The course also considers the concept of a classic in religion and literature. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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REL 3361A. Religion and Film.

This course examines how religions are reflected in film and how films have taken on some of the functions of religion. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics|Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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REL 3361B. Mysticism.

This course explores the dimension of mysticism that pervades both Western and Eastern religious traditions. We will analyze the nature of mystical experiences through a study of key figures and texts, and examine its peculiar relationship to language, arts, and human subjectivity and its place in the wider social context. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics|Writing Intensive
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REL 3361C. Philosophical Issues in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

This course provides a comparative perspective on philosophical issues that arise in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, including the nature of God, reason and revelation, and religious ethics. Readings will draw on both classical and contemporary sources. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics|Writing Intensive
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REL 3370. Mythology and Cosmology.

This course examines human efforts to address questions of cosmic origins, with a global, comparative survey of cosmogonic (creation) myths and a historical approach to modern cosmology. It examines the features and functions of mythopoetic and scientific thought, and reflects philosophically on questions of origin and meaning. May be taken twice for credit with different topics.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
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REL 3372. Apocalypticism.

An historical-cultural survey of end-of-the-world literature, art, and thought in Western Civilization, from ancient Judaism and Christianity to the present. Historical and scientific methods provide the framework for this course. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
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REL 3381. The Philosophical and Spiritual Heritage of India.

Indian philosophers predominantly present a spiritual, multi-dimensional outlook on the nature of reality and human consciousness; they combine reason, experience, yoga and meditation as methods of inquiry. This course will explore Indian spiritual philosophy from the time of the ancient Vedas to the contribution of modern sages. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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REL 3385. Buddhism.

This course surveys the main ideas, myths, symbols and practices of the diverse forms of Buddhism. Students will also get acquainted with the manner in which Buddhist perspectives have influenced social values and arts in the South East and East Asian cultures. (WI).
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Writing Intensive
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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REL 4300. Advanced Methods in Religious Studies.

This course provides a rigorous grounding in the intellectual tradition of academic religious studies. It includes the major theorists and a sustained examination of the problem of method. This course is strongly urged for RS minors and students intending graduate work in the field. Prerequisite: At least one course from those included in the minor; two recommended.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Writing Intensive
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REL 4388. Problems in Religion.

Independent study of specific topics in religion. Open to students on an individual or small group basis. May be repeated for credit with different emphasis.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
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Baltzly, Vaughn Bryan, Assistant Professor, Philosophy, Ph.D., Univ of Maryland College Park

Barcenas Pardo, Alejandro, Assistant Professor, Philosophy, Ph.D., Univ of Hawaii at Manoa

Barton, Seth C, Lecturer, Philosophy, M.A., Texas State University

Benedikt, Amelie F, Senior Lecturer, Philosophy, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Bennett, David Evan, Lecturer, Philosophy, M.A., Texas State University

Bower, Matthew Eugene, Lecturer, Philosophy, Ph.D., The University of Memphis

Carson, Jo Ann, Senior Lecturer, Philosophy, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Conkling, Parish, Lecturer, Philosophy, M.A., Texas State University

Crisp, Carrie Beth, Lecturer, Philosophy, J.D., St. Mary's University

Cross, Anthony Michael, Lecturer, Philosophy, M.A., Princeton University

Edwards, Blake Aaron, Lecturer, Philosophy, M.A., Texas State University

Farinas, Rebecca Lee, Lecturer, Philosophy, Ph.D., Southern Illinois Univ Carbondale

Fischer, Robert W, Assistant Professor, Philosophy, Ph.D., Univ of Illinois at Chicago

Gallegos de Castillo, Lori Lee, Assistant Professor, Philosophy, Ph.D., State Univ of NY at Stony Brook

Garcia, Jennifer Nicole, Lecturer, Philosophy, M.A., Texas State University

Gerhart, Olga Stadelmann, Lecturer, Philosophy, Ph.D., Texas A&M University

Geuras, Dean J, Professor, Philosophy, Ph.D., University of Colorado Boulder

Gilbertson, Eric N, Senior Lecturer, Philosophy, Ph.D., Cornell University

Hanks, Craig, Chair - Professor, Philosophy, Ph.D., Duke University

Hill, Joshua DeVere, Lecturer, Philosophy, M.A., Texas State University

Hobbs-Darilek, Kyla Rose, Lecturer, Philosophy, M.A., Texas State University

Hutcheson, Peter W, Professor, Philosophy, Ph.D., Univ of Oklahoma Norman Campus

Istvan, Michael Anthony, Lecturer, Philosophy, Ph.D., Texas A&M University

Kanon, Elizabeth P, Lecturer, Philosophy, Ph.D., Florida State University

Laycock, Joseph P, Assistant Professor, Philosophy, Ph.D., Boston University

Lewis, Holly M, Assistant Professor, Philosophy, Ph.D., European Graduate School

Luizzi, Vincent L, Professor, Philosophy, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania

Marquez, Ivan, Assistant Professor, Philosophy, Ph.D., Indiana University Bloomington

McKinney, Audrey M, Associate Professor, Philosophy, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania

Mehta, Binita Vinod, Senior Lecturer, Philosophy, Ph.D., University of Iowa

Mikles, Natasha LeeAnn, Lecturer, Philosophy, M.A., University of Chicago

Montemayor, Enrique Eduardo, Lecturer, Philosophy, M.A., Texas State University

Moses, Russell G, Lecturer, Philosophy, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

O'Connor, Robert F, Lecturer, Philosophy, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Ozturk, Burkay T, Lecturer, Philosophy, Ph.D., Univ of Illinois at Chicago

Pepas, Samantha E, Lecturer, Philosophy, M.A., Texas State University

Pommerening, Amy Marie, Lecturer, Philosophy, Ph.D., Purdue University Main Campus

Raphael, Rebecca, Associate Professor, Philosophy, Ph.D., University of Chicago

Ray, Keisha Shantel, Assistant Professor, Philosophy, Ph.D., University of Utah

Reesor, Nevitt D, Lecturer, Philosophy, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Ross, Rebekah Jean, Senior Lecturer, Philosophy, M.A., Southern Illinois U, Edwardsville

Stansell, Ellen Briggs, Lecturer, Philosophy, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Stockton, Travis Wellington, Lecturer, Philosophy, M.A., Texas State University

Surovell, Jonathan Reid, Lecturer, Philosophy, Ph.D., Univ of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh

Watson, Coleen M, Lecturer, Philosophy, M.A., Texas State University

Wiegman, Isaac Thane, Lecturer, Philosophy, Ph.D., Washington Univ in St. Louis

Wilson, Paul A, Senior Lecturer, Philosophy, M.A., Texas A&M University

Yuan, Lijun, Professor, Philosophy, Ph.D., University of Colorado Boulder