Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Major in Criminal Justice

The School of Criminal Justice at Texas State offers a doctoral program for:

  1. criminal justice professionals who seek advanced education and
  2. students who will pursue academic appointments at colleges and universities in Texas and around the nation.

Texas State is located in the heart of the central Texas corridor, near 16 state criminal justice offices and 13 Texas counties, including Travis (Austin) and Bexar (San Antonio). The university's geographic proximity to state criminal justice agency headquarters for law enforcement, criminal courts, and corrections, and to managers and executives in these agencies, makes it an ideal location for offering a doctoral-degree program.

The doctoral program is part of a vibrant school, with approximately 1000 bachelor's students and 30 master's students. Twenty-three full-time faculty members are involved in a wide range of research. A list of faculty and their research interests is available at http://www.cj.txstate.edu/people/faculty. The School of Criminal Justice also administers a number of institutes and centers, including the Center for Geospatial Intelligence and Investigation and the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training Center (ALERRT).

Courses are offered in the evenings for the convenience of working professionals. Students are classified as either full-time (nine hours per term) or part-time. All students will be given the opportunity to initiate, complete, present, and publish original research. Each student develops an appropriate degree plan to meet their career and academic goals. The degree plan will include a mix of theoretical, analytical, and elective courses that will prepare students to work independently and in multidisciplinary teams.

Educational Goal

The central educational goal of the Ph.D. program in criminal justice at Texas State is to prepare doctoral students to assume leadership roles in academic, public policy, and administrative positions within a rapidly changing criminal justice system. The Ph.D. program produces outstanding researchers who are qualified for academic positions and prepares practitioners to conduct research in criminal justice agencies. The school has developed a programmatic perspective that is sensitive to the importance of research skills, balanced with theoretically informed policy analysis, so that students can more effectively address the challenges in criminal justice in Texas and across the nation. Students gain expertise to apply statistically advanced research methodologies to conduct empirical studies in crime, law, public policy, and administration of the criminal justice system.

Other educational goals and objectives are to:

  • Identify the theoretical perspectives and foundations of current research in the study of crime, law, and public policy decision-making undertaken by criminal justice agencies to assist law enforcement, court personnel, and corrections staff to plan, develop, and implement timely, efficient, and sound responses to crime.
  • Apply precise, empirically validated, and tested research methods to investigate, analyze, and improve theory and policy to provide policy makers with the most current research and applicable technology to address emergent public safety growth areas.
  • Communicate effectively to educate and inform professional managers and administrators of criminal justice agencies, their service personnel (e.g., police) and the community at-large about the ‘best practices’ for addressing the control of crime at the neighborhood, community, state, and national levels.
  • Recognize ethical dilemmas and make ethically sound decisions to ensure that recommended criminal justice policy becomes a useful guide, if not benchmark procedure, for executives and heads of criminal justice agencies as they develop their strategic plans to address crime and public safety at the local, state, and national levels.

Apply a broad understanding of the legal and empirical elements of criminal justice administration in leadership positions to encourage current and future working professionals and executives in criminal justice agencies to incorporate more comprehensive training using the ‘best practices’ in leadership and management theory when developing, planning, and implementing policies that effect their own agencies and the surrounding communities they serve.

Admission Policy

For information regarding admission application requirements and deadlines, please visit The Graduate College website at: www.gradcollege.txstate.edu/cjp.html .

Financial Assistance

Assistantships and scholarships are available to qualified applicants. The School of Criminal Justice offers doctoral instructional assistantships and teaching assistantships on a competitive basis to full-time students enrolled in the criminal justice Ph.D. program. An offer of financial support will normally be made at the time that a student is accepted into the program. The Graduate College can provide further information regarding scholarships.

Application Requirements

The items listed below are required for admission consideration for applicable semesters of entry during the 2017-2018 academic year. Submission instructions, additional details, and changes to admission requirements for semesters other than the 2017-2018 academic year can be found on the program’s web page. International students should review the International Admission Documents section of the catalog for additional requirements.

  • completed online ApplyTexas application
  • $40 nonrefundable application fee
  • $50 nonrefundable international evaluation fee (if applicable)
  • baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited university
  • master's degree in criminal justice or a related field from a regionally accredited university
  • official transcripts required from each four-year institution where course credit was granted
  • minimum 3.5 GPA in all completed graduate course work
  • official GRE scores required with a preferred minimum of 300 (verbal and quantitative sections combined) with no less than 150 in the verbal section and 150 in the quantitative section
  • statement of purpose 
  • three letters of recommendation 

TOEFL or IELTS Scores

Non-native English speakers who do not qualify for an English proficiency waiver:

  • official TOEFL iBT scores required with a 78 overall
  • official IELTS (academic) scores required with a 6.5 overall and
    • minimum individual module scores of 6.0

This program does not offer admission if the scores above are not met.

Degree Requirements

The Ph.D. in Criminal Justice requires students to complete, at a minimum, 51 semester credit hours.  A degree audit is available to students when they begin the Ph.D. program. Students should periodically review the degree audit with the Doctoral Program Director until graduation. With admission into the doctoral program, it is expected that students will pursue their course work and research activities in an efficient and timely manner. If it is determined that a student is not making adequate progress toward completion of the doctoral degree requirements, consultations will be undertaken between the student, the student's dissertation chair (when applicable), the program director, and the Schools doctoral executive council to develop a remediation plan, which may include revising a student's program of study or research. Failure to successfully remedy documented deviancies will result in termination of the student's enrollment in the doctoral program at the discretion of the doctoral council. Students removed from the doctoral program in this manner may appeal to the dean of the Graduate College for reinstatement in the program.

Course Requirements and Qualifying Examination

All students are required to take CJ 7311 Advanced Criminological Theory, CJ 7320 Quantitative Research Methods, CJ 7321 Linear Regression for Criminal Justice Research in their first year. All doctoral students are required to enroll in CJ 7309 Proseminar during their second or third year to learn about the criminal justice discipline, teaching, publishing, grants and fellowships, writing dissertations, and post-doctoral employment. Doctoral students selected for teaching assistantships will be required to enroll in CJ 7301 Instructional Assistant Supervision during the first semester they teach.

All students take a qualifying examination one to two weeks after completion of their first year in the program. The qualifying examination integrates criminological theory, quantitative methods, and regression. The examination is graded by those professors who taught the first-year required courses or those in a pool who have previously taught the courses. One re-examination is offered at midsummer for those who fail. Students who fail the re-examination will be dismissed from the program.

Students are required to take 12 hours of electives spread across four areas: (1) criminal justice system, (2) advanced statistics, (3) advanced research methods, and (4) nature and causes of crime. Students are required to take one criminal justice system course (CJ 7310 Philosophy of Law, Justice, and Social Control or CJ 7312 Criminal Justice Ethics, Administration, and Public Policy). Students are also required to take one advanced statistics course (CJ 7350A Forecasting, Trend Analysis, and Data Interpretation, CJ 7350E Discrete Multivariate Models, or CJ 7350I Introduction to Structural Equation Modeling). Students are required to take on advanced research methods course ( CJ 7322 Advanced Research for Planning and Evaluation, CJ 7330 Qualitative Research Methods or CJ 7336 Survey Methods for Criminal Justice). Students are also required to take one course in nature and causes of crime (CJ 7313 Race and Ethnicity in Crime and Criminal Justice, CJ 7350F Environmental Criminology, CJ 7350G Seminar in Macro Criminology, or CJ 7350L Sex Offenders: Theory , Research, and Application).

Students are required to take an additional five courses from the list of Other Electives below or any of the Area Electives not chosen to meet requirements. When relevant, students may also take doctoral-level courses from other programs at Texas State University. The following table summarizes the course requirements.

First-Year Required Courses9
Advanced Criminological Theory
Quantitative Research Methods
Linear Regression for Criminal Justice Research
Area Electives12
Criminal Justice System (Choose one of the following)
Philosophy of Law, Justice, and Social Control
Criminal Justice Ethics, Administration, and Public Policy
Advanced Statistics (Choose one of the following)
Forecasting, Trend Analysis, and Data Interpretation
Discrete Multivariate Models
Introduction to Structural Equation Modeling
Advanced Research Methods (Choose one of the following)
Advanced Research for Planning and Evaluation
Qualitative Research Methods
Survey Research Methods for Criminal Justice
Nature and Causes of Crime (Choose one of the following)
Race and Ethnicity in Crime and Criminal Justice
Environmental Criminology
Seminar in Macro Criminology
Sex Offenders: Theory, Research & Policy
Other Electives15
(Choose five courses from below or above courses not chosen to meet requirements)
Applied Statistics and Quantitative Data Analysis
Law and Behavioral Science
Law and Public Policy
Legal and Legislative Research
Organizational Theory
Criminal Justice Leadership and Management
Comparative Criminal Justice Systems, Philosophies, and Public Policy
Academic Scholarship and Communication
Qualitative Data Collection, Coding and Analysis
Ethnography of Criminal Justice
Advanced Methodological Paradigms in Criminal Justice
Criminal Justice Forecasting and Policy Analysis
Independent Study
Additional Requirement3
Proseminar
Dissertation12
Dissertation
Dissertation
Dissertation
Dissertation
Dissertation
Dissertation
Total Hours51

Advancement to Candidacy

Application for Advancement to Candidacy

Students can download the “Application for Advancement to Candidacy form” from The Graduate College website. The student should complete and sign the upper portion of the form and return it to the program director. When all requirements for admission to candidacy have been met (completion of course-work, a passing grade on the comprehensive examination, approval of dissertation chair and committee, and submission of an approved dissertation proposal), the program director will forward the Application for Advancement to Candidacy form to the dean of The Graduate College for review and approval.

The dean of The Graduate College approves advancement to candidacy once all requirements are met and at the recommendation of the program director.

In addition, before advancement to candidacy, students are required to complete the following:

  1. Completion of all courses toward the doctoral degree with a GPA of 3.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale.
  2. Passing grade on the comprehensive examination. "Pass" is the only satisfactory grade.
  3. The student must select a dissertation chair, and that chair must be approved by the doctoral executive council. The student also must select a dissertation committee comprised of three additional members of the doctoral faculty and at least one external member from outside the department or the University.
  4. The student must choose a topic with the approval of the student’s dissertation advisor and committee.
  5. The student will submit a title and a written proposal for the dissertation to the student’s dissertation committee and successfully defend the proposal in an oral presentation with the dissertation committee. The proposal will include a statement of the problem to be studied, a discussion of the relevant literature, and the research method of the proposed dissertation topic.
  6. The program director will make a recommendation to the graduate dean who makes the final decision on the student’s advancement to candidacy. The Graduate College will notify the student once the decision has been made.

Advancement to Candidacy Time Limit

Full-time, traditional students should be advanced to candidacy within five years of initiating Ph.D. course-work applied toward the degree. Non-traditional, part-time students may request extensions from the Doctoral Executive Council as long as they maintain a GPA of 3.0 and are making consistent progress toward fulfilling their degree requirements. The Doctoral Executive Council will review part-time students’ requests for extensions on an individual, case-by-case basis.

No credit will be applied toward a student’s doctoral degree for course-work completed more than five years before the date on which the student is admitted to candidacy. This time limit applies to course credit earned at Texas State, as well as course credit transferred to Texas State from other accredited institutions.

Grade-Point Requirements for Advancement to Candidacy

A minimum GPA of 3.0 on all course work undertaken as a doctoral student in the criminal justice program is required for admission to candidacy. No grade earned below “B” on any course work may apply toward a Ph.D. degree in criminal justice at Texas State.

Incomplete grades must be cleared through The Graduate College at least ten days before approval for advancement to candidacy will be granted.

Dissertation Proposal

A dissertation proposal prepared by the student and approved by the student’s dissertation chair and a majority of the other members of the dissertation committee is a requirement for Advancement to Candidacy status. The proposal must outline the substance and scope of the dissertation research, present the methodology to be used, and survey the relevant literature. The student’s dissertation chair and other dissertation committee members must indicate approval of the dissertation proposal on the “Dissertation Proposal and Proposal Defense” form. This form can be downloaded from The Graduate College website. A final copy of the dissertation proposal, accompanied by the signed approval form, must be turned in to the program director, who will forward it to the dean of The Graduate College for review and final approval.

Advancement to Candidacy Comprehensive Examination

The comprehensive exam involves completion of an empirical research project (with data analysis) and a single-authored article about it (not to exceed 6,000 words, excluding references) that, in the examination committee's view, is suitable for publication in a refereed journal. The purpose of the comprehensive exam is to assess a student's ability to critically assess previous research on a topic, develop a research question on it, and complete independent research to address the question. Students need to disclose to the examining committee if the article originated in a class or if there are other potential conflicts with it.

The examining committee is comprised of a chair and two other members. All must be members of the doctoral faculty, and the chair must be a member of the Core Doctoral Faculty. The chair is chosen by the student, and the other two committee members are chosen at random by the Doctoral Program Director from a list of doctoral faculty members. A form with the committee's composition must be filed with Doctoral Program Director when the committee is constituted. The committee must be constituted no later than when a student has completed 27 hours of doctoral coursework. The committee must approve the topic for a student's article, and a written description of the topic will be distributed to all members of the doctoral faculty. The examining committee's assessment of the student's article will be based on: (1) the quality of the research question, (2) the appropriateness of the methods and data analysis, (3) the adequacy of the articles connection to previous research, (4) the appropriateness of the interpretations of the data analysis, and (5) the quality of writing. A simple majority vote (2 of 3) is sufficient for deciding a grade. After completing 27 hours of coursework, a student can submit an article to their committee for grading. A student has until the semester after, they have completed 39 hours of doctoral coursework to receive a passing grade on an article. If a passing grade is not achieved by this point, the student will be dismissed from the program. Articles can be submitted for grading to the examining committees during the first three weeks of the fall semester or the first three weeks of spring semester.

The examining committee will have graded a submitted article within three weeks of receiving it. The grade options are "pass", "fail", and "revise and resubmit." If a student's article is assigned a "revise and resubmit," the student will have one semester to submit a revised version in order to receive a passing grade. The chair of the student's committee will summarize in writing what changes need to be considered in the revision for a "pass." If a student's article is assigned a "fail," the student will have one semester to submit an article on a new topic and receive a passing grade for it. The chair of the student's committee will explain in writing reasons for the failure. The same three graders will be used for an article that is assigned a "revise and resubmit." A student can select a new committee chair for a "failed" article, and two new committee members will be assigned by the Doctoral Program Director. In the event that a student's second resubmission of an article is assigned a "fail," the student will be dismissed from the program.

Full-time, traditional students are expected to pass their comprehensive examination by the end of their third year. For non-traditional, part-time students, the three years can be extended on an individual, case-by-case basis. However, extensions will require the approval of the doctoral council.

Recommendation for Advancement to Candidacy

The program director recommends the applicant for Advancement to Candidacy. Students must submit an official "Application for Advancement to Candidacy" form when all requirements are met (completion of coursework, a passing grade on the comprehensive examination, approval of dissertation chair/committee, and submission of an approved dissertation proposal). This form can be downloaded from the Graduate College website. The results of the comprehensive examination and the completed Application for Advancement to Candidacy form must be filed in the Graduate College before the dean of The Graduate College gives final approval to candidacy. The Program director is responsible for submitting these forms to The Graduate College.

Dissertation Research and Writing

All doctoral students are required to complete a dissertation. The dissertation must present a systematic inquiry into a relevant research question, be informed by prior research, and add to the body of knowledge in the field. In most cases, the research will be quantitative in nature, although qualitative or legal research may be utilized in some cases. It is expected that the dissertation will provide the content for one or more publishable articles in academic journals.

Students are required to complete the following dissertation requirements:

  1. The student will complete the dissertation, which must be an original contribution to scholarship and the result of independent research in a significant area of criminal justice. The student is expected to write the dissertation and orally defend it in an announced public presentation within three years of the official date of being advanced to candidacy. Questions posed to the student are initially limited to the dissertation committee membership. However, at the discretion of the presiding chair and when time permits, questions will also be solicited from the attending public audience. The approval of the dissertation requires the approval of the dissertation chair and the approval of a majority of the other members of the committee. A written notice of the dissertation committee’s approval will be forwarded to the program director and then to the graduate dean.
  2. If the dissertation committee decides not to approve the candidate’s dissertation, the dissertation chair will prepare a written response to the doctoral executive council, accounting for the decision and outlining the steps required for approval. These steps will also be communicated to the candidate.
  3. The student will submit the final, approved dissertation to The Graduate College in the prescribed format.
  4. The program director will conduct a final review of the coursework and recommendation from the student’s dissertation committee before making a recommendation to the graduate dean that the student be awarded the Ph.D. degree with a major in criminal justice. The graduate dean will certify that the student has met all of the requirements and can be awarded the degree.

Dissertation Enrollment Requirements

After being admitted to candidacy, students must be continuously enrolled for dissertation hours each term until the defense of their dissertation. If a student is receiving supervision on the dissertation during the summer or the student is graduating during the summer, the student must be enrolled in dissertation hours for the summer. All candidates for graduation must be enrolled in dissertation hours during the semester in which the degree is to be conferred. Students must complete a minimum of 12 semester hours of dissertation credit.

Dissertation Time Limit

It is expected that the dissertation will, in most cases, be completed in two terms of concentrated effort and in no more than six terms. Students must appeal to the doctoral executive council for an extension beyond six terms. The student must pass an oral defense of their dissertation before final completion of the doctoral program.

Fee Reduction

A master’s or doctoral-degree candidate for graduation may be eligible for a one-time fee reduction under V.T.C.A. Education Code, Section 54.054. Please refer to the section titled Fee Reduction in the Additional Fees and Expenses chapter of this catalog for more information.

Dissertation Committee

The dissertation committee will oversee the research progress of a doctoral student and the writing of the student's dissertation. The committee will consist of at least four members, including the student's dissertation chair, two additional members of the doctoral faculty and at least one external member from outside the School of Criminal Justice of the University. The student's dissertation chair will be a member of the core doctoral faculty in the School of Criminal Justice. The student, program director, school director, and the dean of The Graduate College will approve the composition of dissertation committee. The student is responsible for obtaining committee members' signatures on the "Dissertation/Research Advisor Assignment form: and the "Dissertation Committee Request form" which can be downloaded from the Graduate College website.

Dissertation Defense

The dissertation defense may not be scheduled until all other academic and program requirements have been fulfilled. A complete draft of the dissertation must be given to the members of the dissertation committee at least 65 days before the date of commencement during the term in which the student intends to graduate. After committee members have reviewed the draft with the student and provided comments, the student, in consultation with the dissertation chair, will incorporate the recommended changes into a second draft of the dissertation. When each committee member is satisfied that the draft dissertation is defendable, the dissertation defense may be scheduled.

The student is expected to orally defend the dissertation in an announced public presentation within three years of the official date of being advanced to candidacy. Questions posed to the student are initially limited to the dissertation committee. However, at the discretion of the dissertation chair and when time permits, questions will also be solicited from the attending public audience. The approval of the dissertation requires the approval of the dissertation chair and the approval of a majority of the other members of the committee. A written notice of the dissertation committee’s approval will be forwarded to the program director, and then to the dean of The Graduate College. Specific information on the examination procedure can be found in the School of Criminal Justice Ph.D. Handbook or obtained from the doctoral director.

Approval and Submission of the Dissertation

Following approval of the dissertation by the members of the dissertation committee, the student must submit one copy of the dissertation and a signed "Thesis/Dissertation Committee Approval form" to the office of The Graduate College for final approval. Specific guidelines for approval and submission of the dissertation can be obtained from The Graduate College. 

Doctoral level courses in Criminal Justice: CJ

Courses Offered

Criminal Justice (CJ)

CJ 7199. Dissertation.

Original research and writing in criminal justice to be accomplished under direct supervision of the dissertation advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each long semester for at least three dissertation hours. Graded on credit (CR), progress (PR), no-credit, (F) basis.
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1 Credit Hour. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

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CJ 7299. Dissertation.

Original research and writing in criminal justice to be accomplished under direct supervision of the dissertation advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each long semester for at least three dissertation hours. Graded on credit (CR), progress (PR), no-credit, (F) basis.
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2 Credit Hours. 2 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

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CJ 7301. Instructional Assistant Supervision.

This course prepares doctoral students employed as research or teaching assistants to perform effectively in diverse instructional settings. The course provides for regular and planned opportunities for continuing evaluation of students. This course does not earn graduate degree credit.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Graduate Assistantship|Exclude from Graduate GPA
Grade Mode: Leveling/Assistantships

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CJ 7309. Proseminar.

This course introduces students to information that is useful to their success as Ph.D. students and after graduation. Topics include the criminal justice discipline, teaching, publishing, grants and fellowships, writing dissertations, and post-doctoral employment. Emphasis is placed on identifying and coordinating opportunities for research and scholarship among faculty and students. Must have completed 12 hours of doctoral credit in Criminal Justice to enroll in this course.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7310. Philosophy of Law, Justice, and Social Control.

A current, thorough, and comprehensive review of the criminal justice system focused on how the system functions, and its current needs and future trends. Students submit extensive critiques and participate in panel discussions.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7311. Advanced Criminological Theory.

An overview of the major criminological paradigms is presented focusing on the causes of crime and deviant behavior. The course includes a discussion of criminological theories from a philosophy of science perspective focusing on such issues as theory construction, theoretical integration, and the formal evaluation of theory and policy.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7312. Criminal Justice Ethics, Administration, and Public Policy.

This course addresses the role of ethics in criminal justice organizations and policymaking. Topics include the moral philosophy of criminal justice, the role of natural and constitutional law, codes of ethics and ethical review systems, and ethical decision-making by criminal justice professionals with attention to training issues.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7313. Race and Ethnicity in Crime and Criminal Justice.

An exploration of how issues related to racial and ethnic minorities and criminal behaviors impact criminal justice reactions. Topics include racial disparities related to law enforcement and sentencing, and policy implications related to policing, probation, pre-sentencing and post-release issues.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7314. Policing.

This course examines current problems in American policing and the role of research in their examination and solution. Official crime and victimization statistics and measure of police performance are explained, with a focus on their collection, development, limitations, and utility. Methods and issues in policing research are explored.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7315. Corrections.

This course examines the history, forms, and functions of correctional institutions, their programs and policies, as well as theories of punishment. Topics include the structure and functions of prisons and jails, community corrections, intermediate sanctions, reentry, supermax prisons, and the death penalty.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7320. Quantitative Research Methods.

A course that demonstrates the practical aspects of conducting criminal justice research that uses quantitative methodologies and design. Topics include the philosophy of science; research ethics; methodological designs in establishing causation; nonexperimental/descriptive research; sampling techniques; secondary data sources and data gathering techniques.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7321. Linear Regression for Criminal Justice Research.

Instruction on the use of advanced linear modeling techniques in criminal justice research is addressed. After completing this course, students should be able to evaluate quantitative research articles in the major criminal justice journals and be prepared to complete a major quantitative research project of their own.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7322. Advanced Research for Planning and Evaluation.

An introduction to evaluation and research design methodologies, assessment techniques including modeling and case studies, agency management issues, and on-going policy implications. Course gives students an understanding of the principles and techniques commonly used to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of criminal justice interventions.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7323. Applied Statistics and Quantitative Data Analysis.

This is a course in statistics and data analysis for the purposes of original quantitative research. Topics include descriptive statistics, statistical inference for single and multivariable analysis, and principles underlying the techniques. This course makes extensive use of statistics software and data preparation techniques.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7330. Qualitative Research Methods.

A discussion of the methods and techniques used for achieving interpretable qualitative results in social research. Topics covered include ethnography, focus groups, in-depth interviewing and case studies. Students will be trained in inductive reasoning and coordinating qualitative with quantitative methods.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7331. Law and Behavioral Science.

A review of the issues addressed in the application of the behavioral sciences to the criminal law system. Topics include criminal sanctions and diminished responsibility, civil commitment, victimology, psychology in the courtroom, the role of media, drugs, and alcohol to violence, and how the justice system reacts to violent offenders.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7332. Law and Public Policy.

An examination of the intersections between law and public policy, its effect on criminal justice administration, its role in a free society and the function of law as a tool of social change. Topics include affirmative action, race, gender, privacy rights, and the process of criminalization.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7333. Legal and Legislative Research.

This course presents the methods of research used in the legal system. Students learn to locate and interpret constitutional, statutory and case law, use secondary sources such as scholarly legal treatises, and apply research techniques using both print and electronic sources.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7334. Organizational Theory.

A critical examination of organizational theories with applications to criminal justice where students analyze the developmental state of organizational theory, including historical derivations and the implications of various theoretical paradigms for understanding the functional quality of criminal justice organizations.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7335. Criminal Justice Leadership and Management.

A course focused on identifying problems and solutions in criminal justice management. The case study method and current literature provide a mixture of practical and educational experiences on how leadership styles, human resources, and the organizational environment impact management decisions.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7336. Survey Research Methods for Criminal Justice.

This course addresses the procedures and techniques used to create social surveys including question formulation, metrics, and question scaling. Students learn how to prepare face-to-face, telephone, and mail surveys, and are trained in sampling procedures related to survey administration.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7337. Comparative Criminal Justice Systems, Philosophies, and Public Policy.

A comprehensive study of law, including common, Roman, socialist, and religion-based, including a critical assessment of the major organizational, administrative, and philosophical principles governing the operation of criminal justice systems worldwide, with special attention to international criminal law and human rights.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7350A. Forecasting, Trend Analysis, and Data Interpretation.

A review of quantitative approaches to public policy analysis, the diverse conceptions of the goals and objectives that should be served by policy, and the appropriate role of the policy analyst. Policy consequences are traced to indirect and subtle incentives and disincentives.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7350B. Academic Scholarship and Communication.

A course on conducting academic research, interpreting results and how to prepare manuscripts for publication in refereed journals. Included is a survey of the audiences, topical focus, and submission requirements of the major criminal justice, criminology, and law publications, along with specialized knowledge on achieving success in the scholarship environment.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7350C. Qualitative Data Collection, Coding and Analysis.

This course takes a structured approach to understanding and implementing the various information collection methods used in qualitative research, including formatting the information for coding, coding schemes, and information interpretation.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7350D. Ethnography of Criminal Justice.

A course on the procedures and techniques required to conduct ethnography, fieldwork, in Criminal Justice. Students examine the culture, subculture, and groups within specific components of the criminal justice system in order to develop a deep ethnographic description. Prerequisite: CJ 7330.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7350E. Discrete Multivariate Models.

This course focuses on regression models for discrete outcome variables, sometimes called limited or categorical dependent variables. Topics include maximum likelihood estimation, binary and multinomial logistic models and negative binomial models. Prerequisite: CJ 7321 or its equivalent or approval/permission of both the Instructor and the Doctoral Coordinator.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7350F. Environmental Criminology.

Crime distributes unevenly in space/time. As such, the course examines such questions as (1) What places are dangerous? (2) Why do we study specific crime types? (3) Where do crime types concentrate? (4) Where do offenders go in their normal activities? (5) What are the temporal patterns for crime? Prerequisite: CJ 7311 or its equivalent or approval/permission of both the instructor and the Doctoral Coordinator.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7350G. Seminar in Macro Criminology.

This course has a macro focus, examining criminological theory and research that takes cities, geographical regions, states, and nations as the units of comparison. The importance and relevance of macro criminology for understanding the causes of crime and key criminal justice issues, such as police resources, are explored in depth. Prerequisite: CJ 7311 or its equivalent or permission of both the Instructor and the Doctoral Coordinator.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7350I. Introduction to Structural Equation Modeling.

The course provides an introduction to structural equation modeling, which is sometimes called mean and covariance structure analysis or latent variable analysis. Topics include recursive and non-recursive models, path analysis, measurement models, and factor analysis. Prerequisite: CJ 7321 or its equivalent or approval/permission of both the Instructor and the Doctoral Coordinator.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7350J. Advanced Methodological Paradigms in Criminal Justice.

This course examines the assumptions, foundations, and implications of the methodological paradigms used in criminal justice research. The dominant paradigms are closely examined and alternatives are explored. Prerequisites: CJ 7311, CJ 7320, CJ 7321.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7350K. Criminal Justice Forecasting and Policy Analysis.

This course examines the inputs and outputs of criminal justice programs. It covers forecasting methods using statistical bootstrapping techniques including line fitting methods, moving averages, cohort propagation matrixes, and systems simulations. Prerequisites: Graduate statistics and a working knowledge of Excel and SPSS.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7350L. Sex Offenders: Theory, Research & Policy.

This course will focus on application of theory to explain sexual offenses, research design issues related to researching this salient population of offenders (e.g., ethical issues, gaining IRB approval, research design limitations, social desirability problems in self-report data, and examining available data sources), and examining policy related issues.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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CJ 7360. Independent Study.

Students will work closely with a particular doctoral faculty member and develop in-depth knowledge in a specific topic area of criminal justice. Topics vary according to a student's program needs. Repeatable once for credit with different emphasis. Prerequisite: Approval of the Instructor and the Doctoral Coordinator in Criminal Justice.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

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CJ 7399. Dissertation.

Original research and writing in criminal justice to be accomplished under direct supervision of the dissertation advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each long semester for at least three dissertation hours. Graded on credit (CR), progress (PR), no-credit, (F) basis.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

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CJ 7599. Dissertation.

Original research and writing in criminal justice to be accomplished under direct supervision of the dissertation advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each long semester for at least three dissertation hours. Graded on credit (CR), progress (PR), no-credit, (F) basis.
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5 Credit Hours. 5 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

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CJ 7699. Dissertation.

Original research and writing in criminal justice to be accomplished under direct supervision of the dissertation advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each long semester for at least three dissertation hours. Graded on credit (CR), progress (PR), no-credit, (F) basis.
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6 Credit Hours. 6 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

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CJ 7999. Dissertation.

Original research and writing in criminal justice to be accomplished under direct supervision of the dissertation advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each long semester for at least three dissertation hours. Graded on credit (CR), progress (PR), no-credit, (F) basis.
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9 Credit Hours. 9 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

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