Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Major in Applied Anthropology

Program Overview

The Department of Anthropology’s doctoral program in Applied Anthropology incorporates intercultural communication, interdisciplinary understanding, research design, grant writing, project management, ethics and professional conduct, methods of data collection, and the use of theory in the interpretation of data. The curriculum emphasizes skills that will make Texas State trained applied anthropologists qualified for a broad range of non-academic and academic jobs.

Educational Goal

Our educational goal is to produce the next generation of applied Ph.D. anthropologists—leaders in inter- and intra-disciplinary research who will help solve critical societal problems in the global 21st century. The following educational objectives are reflected in the doctoral coursework and program requirements.

• Research Techniques: With thorough experience using research technology, methods, and data analyses, graduates will have flexible tools for researching complex issues in applied anthropology. Graduates will master these skills through intra- and interdisciplinary course work, research, and their dissertation project.

• Theory: By mastering historical and contemporary theory in anthropology, graduates will have a set of analytical concepts to be effective professionals in practice. Graduates will obtain these skills through intra- and interdisciplinary course work, research, and their dissertation project.

• Professionalism: Graduates will be able to apply ethical decision making, implement best practices, demonstrate effective leadership, become proficient in current topics in applied anthropology, have necessary skills to write competitive grants and contracts, and produce professional reports and manuscripts. Graduates will achieve these skills through intra- and interdisciplinary course work, research, and their dissertation project.

Advising

At the time of acceptance into the program, the student will be assigned a dissertation advisor, who is a member of the doctoral faculty. Beginning in the first semester, the dissertation advisor and the doctoral program coordinator will work with the student to develop a program of study, and provide general academic and career-related advisement to the student. It is expected that students will pursue their course work and research activities in an efficient and timely manner.

Application Requirements

The items listed below are required for admission consideration for applicable semesters of entry during the current academic year. Submission instructions, additional details, and changes to admission requirements for semesters other than the current academic year can be found on The Graduate College's website. International students should review the International Admission Documents page for additional requirements.

  • completed online application
  • $55 nonrefundable application fee

         or

  • $90 nonrefundable application fee for applications with international credentials
  • baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited university (Non-U.S. degrees must be equivalent to a four-year U.S. Bachelor’s degree. In most cases, three-year degrees are not considered. Visit our International FAQs for more information.)
  • master's degree in anthropology or a closely related field from a regionally accredited university (Leveling courses with grades of B or better may be required if background course work is not sufficient.)
  • official transcripts from each institution where course credit was granted
  • competitive GPA, which typically means an overall GPA of 3.3 or higher, in all completed graduate course work
  • GRE not required
  • resume/CV, complete and current
  • statement of purpose (3–5-page maximum, double-spaced) that includes
    • the anthropological subdiscipline for which the student is applying
    • background, experience, and skills
    • identification of the professor(s) with whom the student would like to work
    • specific dissertation research interests
    • reasons for interest in the Texas State program
    • readiness to complete the program in the specified time frame
    • professional plans and goals
    • if applicable, any crossover areas of research from other anthropological sub-disciplines
  • three letters of recommendation addressing and evaluating the student’s skills, academic potential, and ability to successfully complete the program in the specified time frame. Letters should be written by professors, academic instructors, and/or applied anthropology professionals.
  • writing sample, such as the student’s master's thesis or other sample of professional or academic writing

Approved English Proficiency Exam Scores

Applicants are required to submit an approved English proficiency exam score that meets the minimum program requirements below unless they have earned a bachelor’s degree or higher from a regionally accredited U.S. institution or the equivalent from a country on our exempt countries list.

  • official TOEFL iBT scores required with a 78 overall
  • official PTE scores required with a 52
  • official IELTS (academic) scores required with a 6.5 overall and minimum individual module scores of 6.0
  • official Duolingo scores required with a 110 overall
  • official TOEFL Essentials scores required with an 8.5 overall

This program does not offer admission if the scores above are not met.

Degree Requirements

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree with a major in Applied Anthropology requires 54 semester credit hours. Leveling courses with grades of B or better may be required if background course work is not sufficient.

Course Requirements

Required Courses
ANTH 7341Professional Ethics In Anthropology3
ANTH 7344Proposal Writing 3
ANTH 7397Directed Research3
Theory
ANTH 7310Advanced Theory in Anthropology3
Statistics
Choose 3 hours from the following:3
Statistics and Experimental Design II
Discrete Multivariate Models
Intermediate Quantitative Research Design and Analysis
Seminar in Quantitative Research
Advanced Quantitative Methods in Geography
Advanced Social Statistics
Seminar in Advanced Statistical Applications
Research Techniques
Choose 6 hours from the following:6
Special Topics in Anthropological Methods
Introductory Qualitative Methods
Advanced Methods in Primatology
Cultural Resource Management
Advanced Archaeological Techniques
Technical Methods in Anthropology
GIS in Anthropology
Advanced Qualitative Methods
Applied Anthropology Methods
Advanced Human Osteology
Forensic Analysis of Human Skeletal Remains
Prescribed Electives
Choose 15 hours from the following:15
Special Topics in Anthropological Studies
Primate Conservation
Professional Externship
Collaborative Research
Professional Externship
Professional Externship
Population Genetics
Database Management Systems
Specializations in Professional and Technical Communication Topics
Advanced Geographic Information Systems
Practice of Museum Studies and Public History
The Practice of Historic Preservation
Policy Development in the Healthcare Arena
Organizational Behavior and Theory
Marketing Management
Philosophy of Science
Dissertation
Choose a minimum of 18 hours from the following:18
Dissertation
Dissertation
Dissertation
Dissertation
Dissertation
Dissertation
Total Hours54
 

Procedures for Prior Learning Assessment Course Credit:

Students in the Ph.D. in Applied Anthropology program are able to complete a maximum of 12 hours of course work through a prior learning assessment (PLA) evaluation process when they demonstrate mastery of applicable skills and learning outcomes. Students who have recent work, internship or externship experience, or externship opportunities while in the program, are able to substitute this experience for course work. Note that the total number of credits earned through PLA and course transfer must not exceed 12 semester credit hours (for criteria and processes for earning transfer credit, see the relevant section in the catalog). Students who apply for PLA credit must meet the following conditions:

  • The request for PLA credit must be made in the student’s first year in the program.

  • The student must have recent work (last five years) or externship experience in course subjects.

A portfolio of written work is used to evaluate a student’s work and experience for course credit. The student provides a summary document that includes the course description for each course they are requesting PLA credit for, the student learning outcomes for the course (SLOs), and a numbered and detailed explanation of how their experience demonstrates expertise in the subject matter. In addition to the summary document, the student will include supporting materials in the form of appendices, which contain reports, peer-reviewed publications, contracts, grant proposals, etc. The explanation should include in part SLOs of each course under consideration explicitly mapped to parts of the student’s supported materials that demonstrate mastery of the SLO. There should be no “double dipping” of a single aspect of a student’s supporting materials mapped to more than one course SLO. In addition, if credit for several courses is requested, a single aspect of a student’s supporting materials cannot be used for more than course.

The portfolio is evaluated by a PLA evaluation committee, constituted and chaired by the director of the doctoral program and including four core doctoral faculty in the student’s subfield. Approval of the portfolio is required by the doctoral program director and a majority of the evaluation committee. Once approval is recommended by the department, the Ph.D. program coordinator submits a written petition to the Dean of The Graduate College to grant course credit for prior learning assessment. The petition must include the courses for which credit is requested. The petition also includes the decision of the evaluating committee and the summary document created by the student. The appendices are made available on request.

Application for Advancement to Candidacy

When all requirements for admission to candidacy have been met (completion of the 36 semester credit hours of required course work, a minimum GPA of 3.3 with no grades less than a “B” in all course work, passing of the comprehensive or qualifying exam, and successful defense of an approved dissertation proposal) the Ph.D. program director forwards the Application for Advancement to Candidacy to the dean of The Graduate College for review and approval. This application form is available on The Graduate College website. Incomplete grades must have been resolved before approval for advancement to candidacy will be granted.

Grade-Point Requirements for Advancement to Candidacy

A minimum GPA of 3.3 on all course work undertaken in the doctoral program is required for admission to candidacy. Grades below a “B” on any graduate course work cannot be applied toward the Ph.D. degree.

Dissertation Proposal

The proposal must explain the anthropological significance of the research, outline the substance and scope of the dissertation research, detail the methodology to be used and survey the relevant literature.

Comprehensive Examination

The comprehensive exam demonstrates that the student has gained mastery over substantive bodies of literature appropriate to the general topic to be addressed in the dissertation. The comprehensive exam will be based on a reading list generated by the student and agreed upon by their committee. The reading list will typically include examples of appropriate methodology, a review of literature in relevant theory, and a critical discussion of the major research question/topic. (However, other themes may also be appropriate.) A reading list will contain between 80 to 100 journal articles and chapters from edited books. An authored book will be considered the equivalent of 10 articles or book chapters. At least 60% of the reading list will come from journal articles or book chapters from edited books.

The comprehensive exam will be given in the department during two 4-hour time blocks over two consecutive weekdays. The questions for the exam will be created by the student’s dissertation committee and based on the student’s reading list. The number of questions may vary between 2 to 4 questions per day, but the total number of pages written by the students should not to exceed 20 double-spaced pages per day. The exam will be graded by the dissertation committee and returned within two weeks of the exam date.

Dissertation Enrollment Requirements

After being admitted to candidacy, students must be continuously enrolled for dissertation hours each fall and spring semester until the defense of their dissertation. At least 18 semester credit hours of dissertation research must be taken after having advanced to candidacy. If a student is receiving supervision on the dissertation during the summer or if the student is graduating in the summer, the student must be enrolled in dissertation hours for the summer. All candidates for graduation must be enrolled in dissertation hours (e.g., ANTH 7199) during the semester in which the degree is to be conferred, even if they have already satisfied the minimum dissertation hours.

Dissertation Time Limit

Each Ph.D. student must prepare a written dissertation proposal and defend it orally. This should be done by the time the student has completed 36 semester credit hours of required course work with a 3.3 GPA requirement, identified the dissertation committee, passed the comprehensive or qualifying exam, and successfully defended an approved dissertation proposal. After advancing to candidacy a student should complete their dissertation within five years, keeping in mind the ten-year total time limit. If the proposal defense is not passed, the student will have the option of taking a second and final defense in the following long semester. Students will be dismissed from the program if they do not pass the proposal defense the second time.

Dissertation Committee

The student, in consultation with his/her dissertation advisor, must establish a dissertation committee that will consist of four members, including the student’s dissertation committee chair, two other doctoral faculty members from the anthropology department, and one doctoral graduate faculty from another department at Texas State University or from another university. The student’s dissertation committee chair will chair the committee. The student, the dissertation committee chair, and the Dean of The Graduate College will approve the composition of the dissertation committee.

Committee Changes

Any change to the dissertation committee must be submitted using the Dissertation Advisor/Committee Member Change Request Form for approval by the dean of The Graduate College. Committee changes must be submitted no later than 60 days before the dissertation defense. The “Dissertation Advisor/Committee Member Change Request form” may be downloaded from The Graduate College’s website. The initial dissertation committee chair assignment, and its continuation, is subject to the approval of both parties. A dissertation committee chair can be changed with the approval of a student’s assigned dissertation committee chair, a student’s new dissertation committee chair, and the Ph.D. program director. If a dissertation committee chair withdraws mentorship, the student must secure a new dissertation committee chair within one long semester to stay on track in the program. Failure to do so will result in dismissal from the program.

Dissertation Proposal

The proposal must explain the anthropological significance of the research, outline the substance and scope of the dissertation research, detail the methodology to be used, and survey the relevant literature.

Dissertation Research and Writing

All doctoral students must complete a dissertation that must represent an original contribution to scholarship based on independent investigation. The style, organization, and mechanics of the dissertation should follow the Graduate College Guide to Preparing and Submitting a Thesis or Dissertation. Referencing guidelines should either follow the American Anthropological Association or the guidelines from an appropriate professional journal, as deemed acceptable by the dissertation committee.

Dissertation Defense

In the semester in which the student intends to graduate, a complete draft of the dissertation must be submitted to the dissertation committee chair 75 days prior, and to the dissertation committee members 45 days prior, to the final date for dissertation defenses (as set by The Graduate College). After the dissertation committee chair and the committee members have reviewed the draft with the student and provided comments, the student will incorporate the recommended changes into a new draft of the dissertation. When the dissertation committee chair and committee members are satisfied that the draft dissertation is defendable, the dissertation defense may be scheduled. A notice of the dissertation defense should be posted in the department 10 days prior to the defense.

The dissertation defense consists of two parts. The first part is a public presentation of the dissertation research. Notice of the defense presentation will be posted at least two weeks in advance. The second part of the defense will immediately follow the public presentation but will be restricted to the student’s dissertation committee and entails an oral examination over the dissertation research. Approval of the dissertation requires positive votes from the student’s dissertation committee chair and a majority of the members of the dissertation committee. The results are stated on the Dissertation Defense Report form, and it and the Thesis/Dissertation Committee Approval form must be filed in The Graduate College before the Dean of The Graduate College gives final approval to the dissertation.

The student must submit the dissertation to The Graduate College for final approval.  Specific guidelines for approval and submission of the dissertation are found in The Graduate College Guide to Preparing and Submitting a Thesis or Dissertation.

Approval and Submission of the Dissertation

Following approval and signing of the Thesis/Dissertation Committee Approval form by the members of the dissertation committee, the student must submit one copy of the dissertation to the office of The Graduate College for final approval. Specific guidelines for approval and submission of the dissertation can be obtained from the office of The Graduate College. Dissertations must be submitted in electronic format.

Doctoral level courses in Anthropology: ANTH

Courses Offered

Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 7199. Dissertation.

Original research and writing in Applied Anthropology to be accomplished under direct supervision of the dissertation advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each long semester.

1 Credit Hour. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

ANTH 7299. Dissertation.

Original research and writing in Applied Anthropology to be accomplished under direct supervision of the dissertation advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each long semester.

2 Credit Hours. 2 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

ANTH 7300A. Methods in Historical Archaeology.

This course is an advanced survey of historical archaeology methods and theories that will intensively examine current trends in historical archaeology. Students will also be exposed to the material culture from historic period archaeological sites in Texas and North America.

3 Credit Hours. 2 Lecture Contact Hours. 1 Lab Contact Hour.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7300B. Histological Analysis of Bone.

Biomechanical adaptations and important metabolic processes, such as growth and development, are recorded in bone microstructure, and can be observable long after death and the decomposition of other tissues. Histological analysis provides a way to access this record, and is therefore integral to research in forensic anthropology, bioarchaeology, and paleopathology.

3 Credit Hours. 2 Lecture Contact Hours. 1 Lab Contact Hour.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7300C. Introductory Qualitative Methods.

This course provides instruction on qualitative methods and analysis. Students will learn through a combination of lecture and hands-on activities how to design qualitative research projects; collect qualitative data through methods such as interviews, focus groups and observations; analyze this data; and present qualitative results.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7300D. Advanced Methods in Primatology.

In this course, students will learn about the methods used to study primates in captive and field settings, including observational and experimental methods. They will read and discuss recent publications on methods used by primatologists and apply their knowledge to provided examples as well as their own research. Related topics for discussion include research design, ethics, and inclusion in regards to methodology and primatology. Students will emerge from this course with an extensive knowledge of how to apply the appropriate methods to specific questions and hypotheses in primatology, both in the lab and in the field.

3 Credit Hours. 2 Lecture Contact Hours. 1 Lab Contact Hour.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7300E. Curation of Archaeological Materials.

This course introduces students to current techniques and issues in the curation of museum and archaeological collections, combining discussion and presentations with applied work using Texas State’s collections. Topics include the conservation, storage, and handling of artifacts; registering, documenting, and illustrating objects; and managing risk. We will also consider issues in the history, ethics, and governance of collections, as well as aspects of public outreach including exhibit design and education.

3 Credit Hours. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 2 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7300F. Gross Anatomy I.

In this class, students will master the gross human anatomy of the back, upper limb, lower limb, head and neck. Students will dissect human cadavers in the lab each day, and will learn the muscles, blood vessels, nerves, and organs of these areas.

3 Credit Hours. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 2 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7300G. Gross Anatomy II.

This course will allow students to learn the gross anatomical structures of the thorax, abdomen, pelvis and perineum. Students will dissect human cadavers in the lab each day, and will learn the muscles, blood vessels, nerves, and organs of these areas. Prerequisite: ANTH 7300F with a grade of a "C" or better.

3 Credit Hours. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 2 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7301A. Seminar in Forensic Anthropology.

This seminar course is a critical survey of past and current research by forensic anthropologists. Through intensive review of the literature, students will understand the development of the discipline, current best practices, and new research directions within the field, and master the methods and theory used in forensic skeletal analysis.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7301B. Primate Conservation.

This course introduces students to the diversity, distribution, and abundance of nonhuman primates. We will use principles from the field of conservation biology to examine the biological, abiotic, and anthropogenic factors related to primate extinction risk. Specifically, we will examine the various threats facing primate populations today, the ways that scientists define and monitor threatened/endangered populations, and the steps that are being taken to increase the likelihood of their survival.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7301C. Design + Anthropology.

This course will begin by exploring the anthropology of design, including the practices, implications, and expansion of design under contemporary capitalism. Students will then use this knowledge to examine the growing field of design anthropology and learn how anthropologists provide actionable insights and research for design work today.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7301D. Cultural Heritage Management.

This course introduces students to current problems and methods in the stewardship of cultural heritage, tangible and intangible, national and international. We will explore topics including ethics and law, development, tourism, public outreach and opinion, and ongoing threats to cultural heritage.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7301E. The Archaeology of Hunter-Gatherers.

This course is an overview of the development of hunter-gatherers as a focus of research in archaeology. Current methodological and theoretical approaches, especially the use of ethnographic and environmental data, will be demonstrated in an ecologically oriented survey of prehistoric hunter-gatherer research.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7301G. Mortuary Analysis: Perspectives on Death and Burial in the Past.

This course on mortuary analysis examines the role of the dead within past human societies to understand social structures, cultural practices, and traditional beliefs. It integrates bioarchaeological evidence with anthropological theory, emphasizing the theoretical foundations of mortuary studies derived from archaeology, cultural anthropology, and skeletal biology. Through critical discussions and case studies, this course explores the dynamic relationship between the living and the deceased, highlighting the significance of the dead in human history.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 3 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7301I. Medical Anthropology.

This course examines the field of Medical Anthropology, reviews its primary theoretical orientations, and explores some of the health-related issues studied by medical anthropologists. The class also considers the practical nature of health-related research and how anthropologists can contribute to things like policy, treatment, and community interventions.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7301J. Applied Statistics Using R.

This course introduces data science with the R language and environment. The goal is to develop foundations for statistical analysis, with special emphasis placed on the fundamentals of data science. Topics will include data organization and visualization, descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, statistical modeling, and machine learning.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7301K. Language in Society.

This course examines the complexity of language variation, the social reciprocates of variation, and the significance of variation. Students will explore and correlate theoretical concepts with inclusive empirical case studies and use ethnographic methods to broadly engage the diverse use of language by individuals within society.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7301L. Linguistic Anthropology.

This course enhances participants' understanding of essential topics, questions, theories, and methods in studying language and culture dynamics. Participants will learn about the crucial role that language plays in producing, reflecting, or furthering culture, and in orchestrating diverse social relations.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7302. Teaching Anthropology.

This course is an introduction to key concepts and practices in the teaching of college-level Anthropology. It provides training in the practical aspects of classroom instruction, and is required for first-year teaching assistants. The course does not earn graduate degree credit.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Graduate Assistantship|Exclude from Graduate GPA
Grade Mode: Leveling/Assistantships

ANTH 7305. Anthropological Statistics.

In this leveling course, students learn basic quantitative statistics, how to evaluate quantitative methods presented in anthropological research papers, and be prepared for more advanced statistical methods classes. This course does not earn graduate degree credit.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

ANTH 7308. Cultural Resource Management.

Students will examine topics relevant to cultural resource management (CRM), especially archaeology, but also history, architecture, and cultural anthropology, done in compliance with historic preservation and environmental laws. Topics include the history of CRM, legal and regulatory framework, organization, methods, funding, and ethical and practical dilemmas.

3 Credit Hours. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 2 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7310. Advanced Theory in Anthropology.

In this course students examine advanced theory in anthropology, drawing from one or more of the sub-disciplines. It includes both historical perspectives and contemporary usages.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7310F. Ethnography of the US-Mexico Borderlands.

This course examines the history, cultural development, and contemporary politics of the US-Mexican border region from interdisciplinary perspectives with a focus on critical theory and ethnography. Topics discussed will include labor migration, transnationalism, structural violence, religion and spirituality, gender, social movements, political ecology, and creative expression.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7311. Seminar in Cultural Anthropology.

In this leveling course, students learn the historical foundations of cultural anthropology, key theories and methods, and examples of contemporary practice. Topics include evolutionism, functionalism, structuralism, ethnoscience, neo-Marxism, postmodernism, modernity, and ethno-racial formation. The course does not earn graduate degree credit.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from Graduate GPA
Grade Mode: Leveling/Assistantships

ANTH 7312. Seminar in Biological Anthropology.

In this leveling course, students learn the historical foundations of biological anthropology, its key theories and methods, and examples of its contemporary practice in evolutionary theory, human variation, paleoanthropology, primatology, and skeletal biology. The course does not earn graduate degree credit.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from Graduate GPA
Grade Mode: Leveling/Assistantships

ANTH 7313. Seminar in Archaeology.

In this leveling course, students learn the historical foundations of archaeology, its key theories and methods, and examples of its contemporary practice in New World and Old World archaeology. The course does not earn graduate degree credit.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from Graduate GPA
Grade Mode: Leveling/Assistantships

ANTH 7315. Advanced Archaeological Techniques.

The focus of this methods course is the analyses of archaeological materials, such as ceramics, lithics, or the images and symbols of pre-historic cultures. This course may be repeated once for credit, but no more than 6 hours will apply towards the doctoral degree.

3 Credit Hours. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 2 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7326. Technical Methods in Anthropology.

Technical field and laboratory methods provide a suite of tools for anthropologists and related disciplines to collect and analyze data from archaeological, bioarchaeological, forensic, and other contexts. This class focuses on practical aspects of data acquisition, analysis, and management for the various instruments (geophysical, geospatial, and imaging).

3 Credit Hours. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 2 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7341. Professional Ethics In Anthropology.

Anthropologists face a variety of ethical issues as they engage in research with human and animal subjects. In this course, students will focus on many topics including review boards (IRB, IACUC), collaboration with human groups, bioethics, advocacy and activism, repatriation, intellectual property and publication, cultural heritage preservation, and workplace ethics.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7344. Proposal Writing.

In this course, students will develop the expert skills necessary to write competitive research grants and contracts for applied anthropology projects. The goal of this course is for students to write a submission-ready grant to fund their PhD dissertation research. Prerequisite: ANTH 7341 with a grade of "C" or better.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7351. GIS in Anthropology.

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provide a suite of tools for anthropologists. This class focuses on practical aspects of GIS for the acquisition, analysis and interpretation of anthropological data. Students will engage in a hands-on approach to learning GIS applications through data acquisition, thematic mapping, data analysis, and spatial analysis.

3 Credit Hours. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 2 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7352. Advanced Qualitative Methods.

Instruction in this course includes methods necessary to conduct applied cultural anthropology research in interdisciplinary settings. Topics include contextual interviewing, diary studies, free listing, pile sorting, panel studies and surveys. Students will also learn how to design methodologies for different types of projects, including rapid qualitative inquiries.

3 Credit Hours. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 2 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7353. Applied Anthropology Methods.

This class focuses on how anthropology can solve practical problems in various disciplines, including behavioral health, education, human rights, community development, and business. Students will learn about client development, contract negotiations, project design, proposal writing, preparing deliverables, communicating results to a variety of stakeholders, teamwork, networking, and navigating ethical issues.

3 Credit Hours. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 2 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7374. Advanced Human Osteology.

This course is a detailed study of the human skeleton, with focus on individuals at all life stages. Topics include biomechanics, embryology, and histology. Students will learn to identify hard tissue features and landmarks on whole and fragmentary bones and relate these to the associated soft tissue anatomy.

3 Credit Hours. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 2 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7376. Forensic Analysis of Human Skeletal Remains.

This course focuses on technical case report writing and evidentiary best practices in forensic anthropological analysis of human skeletal remains. In addition to biological profile estimation techniques, research methods and theoretical foundations used for trauma analysis and taphonomic interpretation will be reviewed. Prerequisite: ANTH 5375 with a grade of "C" or better.

3 Credit Hours. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 2 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7385. Seminar in Anthropology.

This course introduces students to specialized areas of anthropological inquiry.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7395. Professional Externship.

Under the direction of the dissertation advisor, students will conduct supervised work or research, related to their professional development, at a public or private organization. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

3 Credit Hours. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 2 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7397. Directed Research.

Under the direction of the dissertation committee chair, students will prepare for their candidacy exams by developing a reading list of the theory and methods used in their anthropological sub-discipline. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

3 Credit Hours. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 2 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

ANTH 7398. Collaborative Research.

In this course doctoral students initiate, conduct, and participate in collaborative research with graduate faculty. This course may be repeated once for credit, but not more than 6 hours will apply towards the doctoral degree. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

3 Credit Hours. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 2 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7399. Dissertation.

Original research and writing in Applied Anthropology to be accomplished under direct supervision of the dissertation advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each long semester.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

ANTH 7599. Dissertation.

Original research and writing in Applied Anthropology to be accomplished under direct supervision of the dissertation advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each long semester.

5 Credit Hours. 5 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

ANTH 7695. Professional Externship.

Under the direction of the dissertation advisor, students will conduct supervised work or research, related to their professional development, at a public or private organization. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

6 Credit Hours. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 20 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7699. Dissertation.

Original research and writing in Applied Anthropology to be accomplished under direct supervision of the dissertation advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each long semester.

6 Credit Hours. 6 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7995. Professional Externship.

Under the direction of the dissertation advisor, students will conduct supervised work or research, related to their professional development, at a public or private organization. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

9 Credit Hours. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 40 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ANTH 7999. Dissertation.

Original research and writing in Applied Anthropology to be accomplished under direct supervision of the dissertation advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each long semester.

9 Credit Hours. 9 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit