Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization

Ph.D. Program

The College of Science and Engineering at Texas State capitalized on existing initiatives to create a cutting-edge interdisciplinary materials science, engineering, and commercialization doctoral program. The program contributes to the research, development, and validation of materials to be used in the next generation of electronics, medicines, plastics, sensors, infrastructure, and renewable energy. In addition to receiving departmental-level support, these academic and research capabilities are supported by an institutional ‘top-to-bottom’ commercialization platform. Coupling commercialization with science and engineering, the planned curriculum will infuse an understanding of intellectual property law, skills in business planning, competency in transforming innovations from the lab to commercial production, and the ability to organize and lead interdisciplinary research teams. Therefore, our goal is educate the next generation of scientists and engineers who will perform interdisciplinary research and will emerge as effective entrepreneurial leaders in the advancement of high tech 21st century global discovery and innovation.

Courses may be offered in the evenings for the convenience of working professionals when necessary. Students are classified as either full-time (minimum of nine hours per term) or part-time. All students are required to initiate, complete, present, and publish original research.

Each student develops an appropriate degree plan to meet their career and academic goals. The degree plan will include a mix of theoretical, analytical, and elective courses that will prepare students to work independently and in multidisciplinary teams.

Educational Goal

The central educational goal of the Ph.D. program in materials science, engineering, and commercialization at Texas State is to prepare doctoral students with

  • technical skills necessary to conduct high quality research,
  • an orientation toward interdisciplinary research,
  • a set of business tools and knowledge of business practice, and
  • technical project and business management skills.

Graduates from the program will be equipped with:

  • Technical skills to conduct high quality research. The program is designed to have students plan and carry out cutting edge research in materials science that demonstrates the ability to think through complex problems and arrive at solutions. This goal is supported by a rigorous set of technically oriented course work that will equip students with the fundamental science knowledge necessary to conduct research. The student will also, in consultation with his research advisor and dissertation committee, formulate a research project and produce a proposal for carrying out the research. 
  • The ability to conduct research across scientific and engineering disciplines. Breakthroughs occur when scientists from a variety of disciplines either individually or collaboratively work on important interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary problems. Therefore, we need a new generation of scientists with both rigorous disciplinary training and the ability to communicate and work easily across disciplines. .
  • A set of business tools and knowledge of business practice. Equipping our graduates with the business skills necessary to become entrepreneurs or leaders in industry is a central goal of the program. This educational goal is supported by the core courses in practical and leadership skills in commercialization and entrepreneurship and other elements dispersed throughout the program. These elements include a one-week intensive workshop to be completed in the summer prior to beginning the program. This introductory bootcamp will outline basic aspects of business and commercialization, and equip students with a common language and basic toolkit. Also a second one-week entrepreneur boot camp will be required after the student‘s first year in the program. In addition, two of the candidacy requirements solidify business skills. The student will produce, present, and defend a full business plan for a start-up company. The student will write a Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer Research (SBIR/STTR) proposal. If appropriate, the student will be provided the opportunity to work with a small business on the proposal, and to submit the final document to a funding agency. The students will be further encouraged to submit their business plan to the Texas State Business Plan Competition in an oral presentation before a panel of angel investors, venture capitalists and business owners. In addition, the weekly Commercialization Forum exposes students to successful entrepreneurs and business leaders. This Commercialization Forum will be the venue for oral defense of the student business plans. These requirements will ensure that the student has developed the business skills necessary to succeed.
  • Technical project and business management skills. The ability to manage complex technical projects and businesses is an additional skill that is core to this program. This goal is certainly supported by the core courses. In addition the Commercialization Forum will regularly expose the students to examples of good project management and cases of what not to do in managing projects or businesses. The ability of the student to manage projects can be assessed to some degree by how they manage the business plan, SBIR/STTR proposal, and the implementation of the proposed research plan.

Admission Policy

For information regarding admission application requirements and deadlines, please visit The Graduate College website at http://www.gradcollege.txstate.edu/msec.html.

Financial Assistance

Assistantships and scholarships are available to qualified applicants. Doctoral instructional assistantships and teaching assistantships are offered on a competitive basis to full-time students enrolled in the materials science, engineering, and commercialization Ph.D. program. An offer of financial support will normally be made at the time that a student is accepted into the program. The office of The Graduate College can provide further information regarding scholarships.

Course Work

Degree Audit

Each Ph.D. student is issued a preliminary degree audit by The Graduate College which should be used to plan the student’s course of study. In the first term of enrollment, students should review the degree audit in consultation with their supervising professor and the program director.

With admission into the doctoral program, it is expected that students will pursue their course work and research activities in an efficient and timely manner. If it is determined that a student is not making adequate progress toward completion of the doctoral degree requirements, consultations will be undertaken between the student, their Ph.D. advisor and the program director to develop a remediation plan to revise the student’s program of study or research. Failure to successfully remedy documented deficiencies will result in termination of the student’s enrollment in the doctoral program at the discretion of the program director. Students removed from the doctoral program in this manner may appeal to the dean of The Graduate College for reinstatement in the program within one academic year.

Course Work Requirements

The Ph.D. in materials science, engineering, and commercialization requires students to complete, at minimum, 55 credit hours. Doctoral students selected for teaching assistantships will additionally be required to enroll in MSEC 7100 Doctoral Assistant Development during the first three terms that they teach classes.

Each student will develop a degree plan, in consultation initially with the doctoral program director and after selection, their Ph.D. advisor and committee, who identifies the appropriate doctoral prescribed electives necessary for achieving the degree. Students must complete 37 credits prior to taking a three-part Advancement to Candidacy Comprehensive Examination. The exam will consist of the following parts: SBIR/STTR Grant Proposal, Business Plan, and Oral Examination. 

Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization Ph.D. Program Course Requirements

Doctoral Core22
Doctoral Prescribed Electives15
Dissertation (minimum)18
Total Hours55
Core Courses
MSEC 7101Commercialization Forum (Taken 4 times)4
MSEC 7102MSEC Seminar (Taken 4 times)4
MSEC 7301Practical Skills in Commercialization and Entrepreneurship3
MSEC 7302Leadership Skills in Commercialization and Entrepreneurship3
MSEC 7401Fundamental Materials Science and Engineering4
MSEC 7402Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Concepts4
Prescribed Electives
Select 15 hours from the following:15
Research in Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization
Principles of Technical Project Management
Research in Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization
Collaborative Research/Commercialization Experience
Nanoscale Systems and Devices
Materials Characterization
Thermodynamics and Kinetics for Material Scientists
Quantum Mechanics for Materials Scientists
Nanocomposites
Computational Materials Science
Biomaterials and Biosensors
Frontiers of Nanoelectronics
Nanomaterials Processing
Advanced Polymer Science
Microwave & Power Device Physics and Materials
Thin Film Photovoltaic Devices
Dissertation
Select minimum 18 hours from the following:18
Dissertation
Dissertation
Dissertation
Dissertation
Dissertation
Dissertation
Total Hours55

Advancement to Candidacy

Application for Advancement to Candidacy

Students can download the “Application for Advancement to Candidacy” from The Graduate College website or they can obtain a copy from the doctoral program director. The student should complete and sign the upper portion of the form and return it to the doctoral program director. Students must complete all required course work with the exception of dissertation credit hours and pass the Advancement to Candidacy Comprehensive Examination prior to applying for candidacy.  The Advancement to Candidacy Comprehensive Examination can be taken in the last semester in which the student completes all required course work (with the exception of dissertation credit hours).  When all requirements for admission to candidacy have been met (completion of boot camps or equivalents, all required course work (with the exception of dissertation credit hours), prescribed electives, successful performance on the comprehensive examination, approval of dissertation advisor/committee, and submission of an approved dissertation proposal), the doctoral program director will forward the Application for Advancement to Candidacy to the dean of The Graduate College for review and approval.

The dean of The Graduate College approves advancement to candidacy once all requirements are met.

Before advancement to candidacy can be approved, students are required to complete the following:

  1. Completion of all required course work (with the exception of dissertation credit hours) toward the doctoral degree with a GPA of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale with no grade earned below “B” on any graduate course work to be applied toward the Ph.D. degree. 
  2. Satisfactory performance on the comprehensive examination consisting of the following parts: SBIR/STTR Grant Proposal, Business Plan, and Oral Examination.
  3. The student must select a dissertation advisor, and that advisor must be approved by the doctoral program director. The student also must select a dissertation committee comprised of three additional members of the MSEC doctoral faculty and at least one external member from outside the MSEC program or the university. Other committee compositions are possible but require the approval of the dissertation advisor and the doctoral program director.
  4. The student must choose a topic with the approval of the student’s dissertation advisor and committee.
  5. The student will submit a title and a written proposal for the dissertation to the student’s dissertation committee and successfully defend the proposal in an oral presentation with the dissertation committee. The proposal will include a statement of the problem to be studied, a discussion of the relevant literature, and the research method of the proposed dissertation topic.
  6. The doctoral program director will make a recommendation to the graduate dean who makes the final decision on the student’s advancement to candidacy. The Graduate College will notify the student once the decision has been made.

Advancement to Candidacy Time Limit

Students are expected to advance to candidacy at the end of two years after official enrollment in the program. All are required to have advanced to candidacy by the end of their third year in the program. Students are required to take the Advancement to Candidacy Comprehensive Examination no later than their fourth term in the program. Requests for a time extension must be submitted to the doctoral program director by the student with the concurrence of the Ph.D. research advisor and must be approved by The Graduate College. Non-traditional, part-time students may request extensions from the doctoral program director as long as they maintain a minimum GPA of 3.5 and are making consistent progress toward fulfilling their degree requirements. The doctoral executive council will review part-time students’ requests for extensions on an individual, case-by-case basis.

No credit will be applied toward a student’s doctoral degree for course work completed more than five years before the date on which the student is admitted to candidacy. This time limit applies to course credit earned at Texas State, as well as course credit transferred to Texas State from other accredited institutions.

Grade-Point Requirements for Advancement to Candidacy

A minimum GPA of 3.0 on all course work undertaken as a doctoral student in the materials science, engineering, and commercialization program is required for admission to candidacy. No grade earned below “B” on any graduate course work may apply toward a Ph.D. degree at Texas State.

Incomplete grades must be cleared through the office of The Graduate College at least ten days before approval for advancement to candidacy will be granted.

Advancement to Candidacy Comprehensive Examination

The Advancement to Candidacy Comprehensive Examination can be taken in the last semester in which the student completes all required course work (with the exception of dissertation credit hours).  Students will be required to pass a comprehensive examination that will assess the student‘s preparedness to carry out the proposed plan of dissertation research. Students will be required to take the Advancement to Candidacy Comprehensive Examination no later than their fourth term in the program, unless an extension has been approved by the doctoral program director. To be eligible to take the comprehensive examination, students must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all the core course work, including any course work that is transferred from another institution. The Advancement to Candidacy Comprehensive Examination will consist of two written components and one oral component. Each student will be required to take the Advancement to Candidacy Comprehensive Examination, which will be conducted by their Ph.D. dissertation committee. All committee members must be in attendance for candidacy examinations. Results of the Advancement to Candidacy Comprehensive Examination will be reported on the Doctoral Comprehensive Examination Report form and submitted to The Graduate College. The Advancement to Candidacy Comprehensive Examination will consist of the following three parts: SBIR/STTR Grant Proposal, Business Plan, and Oral Examination.

Should a student fail the exam, he or she will have the option of taking a second examination, which must be passed by the end of the following term. Failure to pass this exam on two occasions will lead to the student's dismissal from the Ph.D. program.

Dissertation Proposal

A dissertation proposal prepared by the student and approved by the student’s Ph.D. advisor and a majority of the other members of the dissertation committee is a requirement for Advancement to Candidacy status. The proposal must outline the substance and scope of the dissertation research, present the methodology to be used, and survey the relevant literature. The dissertation proposal will be defended as part of the Oral segment of the Advancement to Candidacy Comprehensive Exam. The student’s Ph.D. advisor and other dissertation committee members must indicate approval of the dissertation proposal on the “Ph.D. Dissertation Proposal” form. This form can be downloaded from The Graduate College website or it can be obtained from the doctoral program director. A final copy of the dissertation proposal, accompanied by the signed approval form, must be turned in to the doctoral program director, who will forward it to the dean of The Graduate College for review and final approval.

Recommendation for Advancement to Candidacy

The dissertation committee recommends the applicant for Advancement to Candidacy by completing the “Advancement to Candidacy Examination Report” form which can be downloaded from The Graduate College website or obtained from the doctoral program director. The results of the Advancement to Candidacy Comprehensive Examination must be filed in the office of The Graduate College before the dean of The Graduate College gives final approval to candidacy. The doctoral program director is responsible for submitting this report to the office of The Graduate College.

Dissertation Research and Writing

All doctoral students are required to complete a dissertation. The dissertation must represent an original contribution to scholarship based on independent investigation. Preparation of the dissertation should follow the guidelines in the current edition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) or American Institute of Physics (AIP) G37 style manual or in an appropriate professional journal in the designated field, as deemed acceptable by the dissertation committee. After being admitted to candidacy, students must be continuously enrolled for dissertation hours each fall and spring term until the defense of their dissertation. If a student is utilizing university resources toward completion of the dissertation in the summer (including faculty supervision or the use of university facilities), or if the student is graduating in the summer, they must be enrolled in at least one hour of dissertation credit for that term. All candidates for graduation must be enrolled in dissertation hours during the term in which the degree is to be conferred. Students must complete a minimum of 18 semester hours of dissertation research credit.

The student must submit to The Graduate College the approved dissertation in electronic format for publication with the Alkek Library. The graduate dean must approve the dissertation.

Dissertation Enrollment Requirements

After being admitted to candidacy, students must be continuously enrolled for dissertation hours each term until the defense of their dissertation. If a student is utilizing university resources toward completion of the dissertation in the summer (including faculty supervision or the use of university facilities), or if the student is graduating in the summer, they must be enrolled in at least one hour of dissertation credit for that term. All candidates for graduation must be enrolled in dissertation hours during the term in which the degree is to be conferred. Students must complete a minimum of 18 semester hours of dissertation research and writing credit.

Dissertation Time Limit

Students are expected to complete the dissertation within two years after Advancement to Candidacy. Any exceptions to this time limit require the approval of the doctoral program director and the dean of The Graduate College. The doctoral program director will review each student annually to ascertain their progress in pursuing the degree and will consult with the student‘s Ph.D. research advisor and dissertation committee on this matter as appropriate.

Dissertation Committee

The dissertation committee will be responsible for administering the Advancement to Candidacy Comprehensive Examination and will oversee the research progress of a doctoral student and the writing of the student‘s dissertation. The committee will consist of at least five members, including the student‘s Ph.D. research advisor, three other MSEC doctoral faculty and at least one external member from outside the MSEC program or the university. The student‘s Ph.D. research advisor will chair the committee. The student, doctoral program director, and the dean of The Graduate College will approve the composition of the dissertation committee. The Dissertation/Research Advisor form and the Dissertation Committee Request form must be completed to form the committee. These forms may be downloaded from The Graduate College‘s website.

Any changes to the dissertation committee must be submitted using the Dissertation Advisor/Committee Member Change Request form for approval to the dissertation committee chair, the doctoral program director, and the dean of The Graduate College. Changes must be submitted no later than 60 days before the dissertation defense.

The student is responsible for obtaining committee members’ signatures on the Dissertation/Research Advisor Assignment form and the Dissertation Committee Request form, which can be downloaded from The Graduate College website.

Committee Changes

Any changes to the dissertation committee must be submitted using the Dissertation Advisor/Committee Member Change Request form for approval to the dissertation committee chair, the doctoral program director, and the dean of The Graduate College. Changes must be submitted no later than 60 days before the dissertation defense.

The Research Advisor/Committee Member Change Request form may be downloaded from The Graduate College website or obtained from the doctoral program director.

Dissertation Defense

The dissertation defense will not be scheduled until all other academic and program requirements for advancement to candidacy have been fulfilled. A complete draft of the dissertation will be given to the members of the dissertation committee with sufficient time for review, typically two month before the date of commencement during the term in which the student intends to graduate. After committee members have reviewed the draft with the student and provided comments, the student, in consultation with the Ph.D. research advisor, will incorporate the recommended changes into a new draft of the dissertation. When each committee member is satisfied that the draft dissertation is defendable, the dissertation defense may be scheduled.

The dissertation defense will consist of two parts. The first part is a public presentation of the dissertation research. Notice of the defense presentation will be posted at least two weeks in advance. The second part of the defense will immediately follow the public presentation but will be restricted to the student‘s dissertation committee and entail an oral examination over the dissertation research. Approval of the dissertation requires positive votes from the student‘s Ph.D. research advisor and a majority of the remaining members of the dissertation committee. The Dissertation Defense Report form must be filed in The Graduate College before the dean of The Graduate College gives final approval to the dissertation. This form may be downloaded from The Graduate College website.

The student is expected to orally defend the dissertation in an announced public presentation within two years of the official date of being advanced to candidacy.

Approval and Submission of the Dissertation

Following approval and signing of the Thesis/Dissertation Committee Approval form by the members of the dissertation committee, the student must submit one copy of the dissertation to the office of The Graduate College for final approval. Specific guidelines for approval and submission of the dissertation can be obtained from the office of The Graduate College. Dissertations must be submitted in electronic format.

Fee Reduction

A master’s or doctoral degree candidate for graduation may be eligible for a one-time fee reduction under V.T.C.A. Education Code, Section 54.054. Please refer to the section titled Fee Reduction in the Additional Fees and Expenses chapter of this catalog for more information.

Doctoral level courses in Materials Science, Engineering and Commercialization: MSEC

Courses Offered

Materials Science, Engineering and Commercialization (MSEC)

MSEC 7100. Doctoral Assistant Development.

The course is designed to equip the doctoral students with skills and an understanding of proper procedures to be effective teaching assistants. This course does not earn graduate degree credit, and is graded on a credit (CR), progress (PR), or no credit (F) basis.
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1 Credit Hour. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Graduate Assistantship|Exclude from Graduate GPA
Grade Mode: Leveling/Assistantships

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MSEC 7101. Commercialization Forum.

The course is a seminar series exposing students to commercialization issues. The series includes as speakers: successful entrepreneurs, businessmen, research directors, production and process control engineers, intellectual property and licensing experts, management consultants, and technology transfer specialists. Second year students will present business plans that they developed. Repeatable four times for credit.
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1 Credit Hour. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7102. MSEC Seminar.

This course is an introduction to current topics through reading of scientific literature with presentations by guest lecturers as the basis for weekly discussions. Students participate by choosing current, high-quality research articles for discussion and will present at least one article during the semester. Repeatable for credit.
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1 Credit Hour. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7103. Research in Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization.

This research course is for students in Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization who have not yet passed their candidacy exam, typically under supervision of the PhD Research Advisor. Graded on a credit (CR), progress (PR), no–credit (F) basis. Repeatable (with MSEC 7303 hours) for doctoral credit up to 6 hours.
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1 Credit Hour. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

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MSEC 7199. Dissertation.

Original research and writing in Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization, is to be accomplished under direct supervision of the PhD Research Advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each long semester. Graded on a credit (CR), progress (PR), no–credit (F) basis. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: Acceptance into candidacy.
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1 Credit Hour. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

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MSEC 7201. Principles of Technical Project Management.

This course includes planning, budgeting, identification of risks and risk mitigation approaches, resource allocation, review of milestones and schedules, and evaluating projects to measure success. Responsibilities of project managers in the areas of problem solving, motivating and managing creative technical staff in project and matrix organizations will be included.
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2 Credit Hours. 2 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7299. Dissertation.

Original research and writing in Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization, is to be accomplished under direct supervision of the PhD Research Advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each long semester. Graded on a credit (CR), progress (PR), no–credit (F) basis. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: Acceptance into candidacy.
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2 Credit Hours. 2 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

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MSEC 7301. Practical Skills in Commercialization and Entrepreneurship.

This course is the first of a two course series to impart business and commercialization skills by producing a business plan. Key areas covered include intellectual property law, technology transfer and licensing strategies, business plan development, business finance strategies, management structures, project management methods, statistical quality and process control.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7302. Leadership Skills in Commercialization and Entrepreneurship.

Leadership Skills in Commercialization and Entrepreneurship (3-0). This course is the second of a two course series to impart business and commercialization skills by producing a business plan. Key areas covered include intellectual property law, technology transfer and licensing strategies, business plan development, business finance strategies, management structures, project management methods, statistical quality and process control. Prerequisite: MSEC 7301.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7303. Research in Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization.

This research course is for students in Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization who have not yet passed their candidacy exam, typically under supervision of the PhD Research Advisor. Graded on a credit (CR), progress (PR), no–credit (F) basis. Repeatable (with MSEC 7103 hours) for doctoral credit up to 6 hours.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

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MSEC 7304. Collaborative Research/Commercialization Experience.

This course allows Ph.D. level graduate students to initiate, conduct and participate in a collaborative research or commercialization experience with graduate faculty in addition to research conducted under MSEC 7103, MSEC 7303, MSEC 7199 and MSEC 7399. This course recognizes the collaborative nature of the scientific and commercialization enterprise. Repeatable for doctoral credit up to 6 hours.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

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MSEC 7310. Nanoscale Systems and Devices.

This course is an in-depth treatment of physical phenomena in nanoscale structures, and consequences for electronic, photonic, mechanical and other types of devices. The course provides a strong background in devices with applications in nanoelectronics, biomedical systems, micro- and nanoscale manipulation, adaptive optics, and microfluidics.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7311. Materials Characterization.

This course covers skills and knowledge required for microscopy methods including transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, scanning tunneling electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and confocal microscopy. It covers x-ray and neutron diffraction techniques including structure analysis, powder and glancing angle diffraction, pole figure, texture analysis, and small angle scattering.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7312. Thermodynamics and Kinetics for Material Scientists.

This course provides a solid understanding of thermodynamics and kinetics of materials, how the rules of thermodynamics and kinetics relate to real-world phenomena, such as phase transformations, phase diagrams, microstructural evolution, and how to use processing to produce a desired microstructure.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7315. Quantum Mechanics for Materials Scientists.

This course includes quantum-mechanical foundation for study of nanometer-scale materials, principles of quantum physics, stationary-states for one-dimensional potentials, symmetry considerations, interaction with the electromagnetic radiation, scattering, reaction rate theory, spectroscopy, chemical bonding and molecular orbital theory, solids, perturbation theory, and nuclear magnetic resonance.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7320. Nanocomposites.

Characteristics of nanoparticles utilized in nanocomposites, techniques for surface modification, methods for nanoparticle dispersion forming nanocomposites, types of nanocomposites, characteristics of nanocomposites, analytical methods for characterization of composites, and common applications will be discussed. Particular attention will be given to the science and theories explaining the unique behavior of nanocomposites.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7330. Computational Materials Science.

Application of computational techniques to molecular and atomic modeling of materials is discussed along with quantum mechanical modeling, density functional theory approaches, forcefield based molecular modeling, mesoscale modeling, energy minimization, molecular dynamics, vibrational spectra, crystal structures, phase equilibria, physical property prediction, and electronic structure related to magnetic and electrical properties. Prerequisite: CHEM 3340 or equivalent.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7340. Biomaterials and Biosensors.

The course covers the growing field of biomaterials science including materials for prosthetics and implants, mimetic materials, biosensors, diagnostic devices, and drug delivery systems. Particular attention will be given to nanomaterials for diagnosis and treatment of diseases including targeted cancer treatments, drug delivery systems, and advanced imaging methods.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7350. Frontiers of Nanoelectronics.

This course provides an introduction to the operating principles of nanoscale electronic and optical devices. The emphasis is on how leading edge nano-fabrication technology takes advantage of quantum mechanics of reduced sizes and dimensions. Specific examples of devices based on quantum wells, wires, dots and molecular electronics are given.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7360. Nanomaterials Processing.

The course will cover various aspects of processing of nanomaterials from synthesis through incorporation into consumer goods. Specific topics to be covered in the synthesis of nanomaterials will include CVD, MBE, precipitation, spray drying, hydrothermal, electrochemical, mechanical grinding, phase separation, and shock wave.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7370. Advanced Polymer Science.

Advanced topics in polymer science are discussed with a focus on high performance polymers such as high impact, conducting, shape memory, high temperature and the underlying phenomena that provide these unusual properties, and advanced polymer topic areas such as flame retardancy, barrier properties, dielectric properties, rheology, and fiber reinforced composites. Prerequisites: CHEM 5353 or equivalent.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
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MSEC 7395A. Microwave & Power Device Physics and Materials.

This course will develop an understanding of basic microwave and power device physics and technology and the advanced materials that are used in today’s cutting-edge research & development. The primary focus will be wide bandgap semiconductor materials and devices, and their performance metric versus the industry standard Si-based devices. Prerequisites: MSEC 7401, MSEC 7402 with a B or higher.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7395B. Thin Film Photovoltaic Devices.

This course is a survey of the Materials Science of photovoltaic devices with emphasis on device physics including the photovoltaic effect, photon absorption, electrons and holes, generation and recombination, the pn-junction, charge separation, monocrystalline solar cells, thin film solar cells, III-V solar cells, and losses. Prerequisites: MSEC 7401, MSEC 7402 with a B or higher.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7395C. Materials for Sustainable Energy.

This course introduces principles and applications of sustainable energy materials used for energy generation, conversion, and storage. Topics of study include principles (thermodynamics, kinetics, transport phenomena, equivalent circuits, catalysis, and electrochemistry) and selection and performance criteria important for applications including batteries, supercapacitors, fuel cells, electrolyzers, dielectrics, biomass, and piezoelectrics. Prerequisites: MSEC 7401 and MSEC 7402 with grades of "B" or higher.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7395D. Polymer Characterization and Processing.

This course will cover the concepts critical to the characterization and processing of organic polymers. Topics critical to characterization will include molecular weight determination, thermo/mechanical characterization, X-ray scattering, and polymer spectroscopy. Processing topics will include polymer rheology, principles of polymer processing, solution processing, and extrusion. Prerequisites: MSEC 7370 or CHEM 5351 or CHEM 4351 with grades of B or better.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7399. Dissertation.

Original research and writing in Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization, is to be accomplished under direct supervision of the PhD Research Advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each long semester. Graded on a credit (CR), progress (PR), no–credit (F) basis. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: Admission into candidacy.
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3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

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MSEC 7401. Fundamental Materials Science and Engineering.

Fundamental Materials Science and Engineering (4-0). Fundamentals of chemical kinetics, physical properties, and continuum mechanics will be discussed. Topics include electronic and atomic structure of solids, structure of crystalline materials, structural imperfections, fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic principles and equations for closed and open systems, statistical models, phase diagrams, diffusion, phase transformations, conservation laws, and continuum kinematics. Prerequisite: Three-week Business Boot Camp or equivalent and Corequisite: MSEC 7312 or equivalent.
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4 Credit Hours. 4 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7402. Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Concepts.

Fundamentals of quantum mechanics, physics of solid state, and physical electronics and photonics for advanced materials will be discussed. Topics will include quantum basis for properties of solids, lattice vibration, free electron model for magnetism, semiconductors, nanostructures and mesoscopic phenomena, superconductivity, and recent advances in new types of materials. Corequisite: MSEC 7315 or equivalent.
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4 Credit Hours. 4 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

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MSEC 7599. Dissertation.

Original research and writing in Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization, is to be accomplished under direct supervision of the PhD Research Advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each long semester. Graded on a credit (CR), progress (PR), no–credit (F) basis. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: Acceptance into candidacy.
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5 Credit Hours. 5 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

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MSEC 7699. Dissertation.

Original research and writing in Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization, is to be accomplished under direct supervision of the PhD Research Advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each long semester. Graded on a credit (CR), progress (PR), no–credit (F) basis. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: Admission into candidacy.
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6 Credit Hours. 6 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

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MSEC 7999. Dissertation.

Original research and writing in Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization, is to be accomplished under direct supervision of the PhD Research Advisor. While conducting dissertation research and writing, students must be continuously enrolled each long semester. Graded on a credit (CR), progress (PR), no–credit (F) basis. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: Acceptance into candidacy.
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9 Credit Hours. 9 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

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