Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) Major in Public Administration (Thesis Option)

The M.P.A. program cultivates practical, research-oriented students for careers as reflective practitioners guided by democratic values, integrity and service. Students work with faculty who have been recognized nationally for their contribution to outstanding teaching, research, and service. The faculty leads practical research projects to inform public management and public policy in the region. The M.P.A. program is accredited by the Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs, and Administration (NASPAA).

Application Requirements

The items listed below are required for admission consideration for applicable semesters of entry during the current academic year. Submission instructions, additional details, and changes to admission requirements for semesters other than the current academic year can be found on The Graduate College's website. International students should review the International Admission Documents webpage for additional requirements.

  • completed online ApplyTexas application
  • $40 nonrefundable application fee
  • $50 nonrefundable international evaluation fee (if applicable)
  • baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited university
  • official transcripts required from each institution where course credit was granted
  • minimum 3.0 GPA in your last 60 hours of undergraduate course work (plus any completed graduate courses)*
  • official GRE scores not required* 
  • statement of purpose
  • two letters of recommendation
  • public sector experience

TOEFL or IELTS Scores

Non-native English speakers who do not qualify for an English proficiency waiver:

  • official TOEFL iBT scores required with a 78 overall
  • official IELTS (academic) scores required with a 6.5 overall and
    • minimum individual module scores of 6.0

If you do not meet the scores above, you may qualify for English-based conditional admission if you meet the minimum scores below:

  • official TOEFL iBT scores required with a 59 overall
  • official IELTS (academic) scores required with a 5.5 overall and
    • minimum individual module scores of 5.5

*Additional Information
If your last-60-hours GPA falls below the minimum requirement of 3.0, please submit the following:

  • official GRE scores with a preferred minimum of 300 (verbal and quantitative sections combined)

The GRE may be waived if you hold a master's or doctoral degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution. If you hold a master's or doctoral degree (or the equivalent thereof) from an accredited international institution, the GRE may be waived on an individual basis.

Degree Requirements

The Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) degree with a major in Public Administration requires 39 semester credit hours.  All students will be required to complete an applied research project (ARP) and complete an oral defense of the ARP.  Students without public sector experience are required to complete a 3-hour internship course in addition to the 39 hour curriculum while maintaining a "B" average.

Background

Students who have not completed a statistics course in the last five years with a grade of B or better will be required to take PA 5311 as a required elective.  Students who do not have administrative experience must take PA 5389 Internship in Government. The internship can be waived by sending documentation of administrative experience directly to the M.P.A. director. 

Course Requirements

Required Courses
PA 5300Introduction to Public Policy and Administration3
PA 5310Public Finance Administration3
PA 5320Organizational Theory, Change, and Behavior3
PA 5330Public Personnel Administration3
PA 5340Introduction to Public Law3
PA 5350Public Policy Processes3
PA 5370Public Management and Ethics3
PA 5390Applied Research Methodology3
PA 5397Research Design and Proposal Development for Public Administration3
PA 5398Applied Research Project3
Electives
Choose 9 hours from the following:9
Introduction to Statistical Analysis
Program Evaluation and Administrative Statistical Analysis
Public Sector Economics
Public Administration and Information Technology
Public Performance Management
Labor Management Relations
Management Practices in Public Personnel Administration
Urban Transportation Policy
Comparative Public Administration
Ecology and the Politics of Sustainability
Environmental Policy
Introduction to the Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector
Alternative Public Service Delivery Systems
Directed Reading and Research
Internship in Government
Research Practicum
May choose advisor-approved electives from outside the department
Total Hours39

Comprehensive Examination Requirements

An oral comprehensive examination over the applied research project is required for completion of the M.P.A. degree.

If a student elects to follow the thesis option for the degree, a committee to direct the written thesis will be established. The thesis must demonstrate the student’s capability for research and independent thought. Preparation of the thesis must be in conformity with the Graduate College Guide to Preparing and Submitting a Thesis or Dissertation.

Thesis Proposal

The student must submit an official Thesis Proposal Form and proposal to his or her thesis committee. Thesis proposals vary by department and discipline. Please see your department for proposal guidelines and requirements. After signing the form and obtaining committee members’ signatures, the graduate advisor’s signature if required by the program and the department chair’s signature, the student must submit the Thesis Proposal Form with one copy of the proposal attached to the dean of The Graduate College for approval before proceeding with research on the thesis. If the thesis research involves human subjects, the student must obtain exemption or approval from the Texas State Institutional Review Board prior to submitting the proposal form to The Graduate College. The IRB approval letter should be included with the proposal form. If the thesis research involves vertebrate animals, the proposal form must include the Texas State IACUC approval code. It is recommended that the thesis proposal form be submitted to the dean of The Graduate College by the end of the student’s enrollment in 5399A. Failure to submit the thesis proposal in a timely fashion may result in delayed graduation.

Thesis Committee

The thesis committee must be composed of a minimum of three approved graduate faculty members.

Thesis Enrollment and Credit

The completion of a minimum of six hours of thesis enrollment is required. For a student's initial thesis course enrollment, the student will need to register for thesis course number 5399A.  After that, the student will enroll in thesis B courses, in each subsequent semester until the thesis is defended with the department and approved by The Graduate College. Preliminary discussions regarding the selection of a topic and assignment to a research supervisor will not require enrollment for the thesis course.

Students must be enrolled in thesis credits if they are receiving supervision and/or are using university resources related to their thesis work.  The number of thesis credit hours students enroll in must reflect the amount of work being done on the thesis that semester.  It is the responsibility of the committee chair to ensure that students are making adequate progress toward their degree throughout the thesis process.  Failure to register for the thesis course during a term in which supervision is received may result in postponement of graduation. After initial enrollment in 5399A, the student will continue to enroll in a thesis B course as long as it takes to complete the thesis. Thesis projects are by definition original and individualized projects.  As such, depending on the topic, methodology, and other factors, some projects may take longer than others to complete.  If the thesis requires work beyond the minimum number of thesis credits needed for the degree, the student may enroll in additional thesis credits at the committee chair's discretion. In the rare case when a student has not previously enrolled in thesis and plans to work on and complete the thesis in one term, the student will enroll in both 5399A and 5399B.

The only grades assigned for thesis courses are PR (progress), CR (credit), W (withdrew), and F (failing). If acceptable progress is not being made in a thesis course, the instructor may issue a grade of F. If the student is making acceptable progress, a grade of PR is assigned until the thesis is completed. The minimum number of hours of thesis credit (“CR”) will be awarded only after the thesis has been both approved by The Graduate College and released to Alkek Library.

A student who has selected the thesis option must be registered for the thesis course during the term or Summer I (during the summer, the thesis course runs ten weeks for both sessions) in which the degree will be conferred.

Thesis Deadlines and Approval Process

Thesis deadlines are posted on The Graduate College website under "Current Students." The completed thesis must be submitted to the chair of the thesis committee on or before the deadlines listed on The Graduate College website.

The following must be submitted to The Graduate College by the thesis deadline listed on The Graduate College website:

  1. The Thesis Submission Approval Form bearing original (wet) and/or electronic signatures of the student and all committee members.
  2. One (1) PDF of the thesis in final form, approved by all committee members, uploaded in the online Vireo submission system.  

After the dean of The Graduate College approves the thesis, Alkek Library will harvest the document from the Vireo submission system for publishing in the Digital Collections database (according to the student's embargo selection). NOTE: MFA Creative Writing theses will have a permanent embargo and will never be published to Digital Collections. 

While original (wet) signatures are preferred, there may be situations as determined by the chair of the committee in which obtaining original signatures is inefficient or has the potential to delay the student's progress. In those situations, the following methods of signing are acceptable:

  • signing and faxing the form
  • signing, scanning, and emailing the form
  • notifying the department in an email from their university's or institution's email account that the committee chair can sign the form on their behalf
  • electronically signing the form using the university's licensed signature platform.

If this process results in more than one document with signatures, all documents need to be submitted to The Graduate College together.

No copies are required to be submitted to Alkek Library. However, the library will bind copies submitted that the student wants bound for personal use. Personal copies are not required to be printed on archival quality paper. The student will take the personal copies to Alkek Library and pay the binding fee for personal copies.

Master's level courses in Political Science: POSI

Courses Offered

Political Science (POSI)

PS 5100. Instructional Methods Practicum for Graduate Assistants.

This course introduces key concepts and practices in the teaching of college introductory political science courses. It provides regular in-service training and planned periodic evalutations of instructional responsibilities. This course does not earn graduate degree credit. It is repeatable 3 times with different emphases and with a maximum of 4 credit hours.

1 Credit Hour. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Graduate Assistantship|Exclude from Graduate GPA
Grade Mode: Leveling/Assistantships

PS 5199B. Thesis.

This course represents a student's continuing thesis enrollments. The student continues to enroll in a Thesis B course until the thesis is submitted for binding.

1 Credit Hour. 1 Lecture Contact Hour. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

PS 5299B. Thesis.

This course represents a student's continuing thesis enrollments. The student continues to enroll in a Thesis B course until the thesis is submitted for binding.

2 Credit Hours. 2 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

PS 5300. Foundation Studies in Political Science.

Students develop knowledge and skills required for success in graduate-level coursework in Political Science. Course content varies depending on academic preparation. This course does not earn graduate degree credit. The approval of the graduate program director is required. It is repeatable 3 times with different emphases and with a maximum of 12 credit hours.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Exclude from Graduate GPA|Leveling
Grade Mode: Leveling/Assistantships

PS 5301. Approaches to the Study of Political Science.

This course provides an intensive introduction to the advanced study of political science. It focuses on the key concepts, variables, and approaches used to describe, explain, and predict political phenomena. It also discusses key normative theories and the variety of methodologies used in political science.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5302. Political Research and Methodology.

This course is a topical seminar for the exploration of problems in the scope and the methods of political science and public administration. The course emphasizes quantitative methods.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5310. Studies in Ancient and Medieval Political Thought.

This course covers selected topics in Greek and Roman political theory, patristic understanding of politics, and the political theory of the Middle and High Middle Ages. This course includes study of the writings and thought of Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, Al-Farabi, John of Salisbury, Aquinas, and others.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5311. Social Contract Theory.

This course is an examination of the social contract, consent, and popular sovereignty in early modern thought. Attention is given to the work of Thomas Hobbs, John Locke, Jean Jeaques Rousseau, and Immanuel Kant (as well as others) and to their critics both then and now.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5312. Roots of American Constitutionalism.

This course examines the origins and evolution of the ideas which inform the American constitutional system, includes an examination of classical, Christian, medieval, Renaissance, and Enlightenment thought that, combined with the British liberal tradition, laid the groundwork for the American experiment.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5313. Justice and Liberty in American Thought.

This course examines the concepts of justice and liberty in American thought from the seventeenth century to the present. Attention is given both to the nature of liberty and justice and to their practical requirement as understood by various American thinkers, including statesmen, reformers, social scientists, and philosophers.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5315. Contemporary Perspectives in Modern Liberalism.

This course is a bried review of the history and development of modern liberalism and the ensuing response and contemporary alternatives.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5316. The Crisis of Liberalism and The Future of Democracy.

This course is an examination of the nature and intellectual foundations of the liberal tradition and the implications of the crisis besetting contemporary theory for the future of democractic government.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5317. Theological Perspectives in Modern Democracy.

This course explores the influence of religion on the rise of modern democracy and the efforts of various religious thinkers to explore the nature and foundations of democratic government.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5318. The Problem of Power and the Crisis of Modernity.

This course is an examination of the crisis of modernity and its implications for humanity's future.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5330A. Nuclear Weapons in International Politics.

This course examines the effects of nuclear weapons on international politics. The course begins with a comparative historical account of the nuclear arms race and efforts to achieve nuclear arms control and disarmament. It then shifts to examine contemporary theories of nuclear proliferation and the case studies which illumine them.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5330B. Tocqueville and American Democracy.

This course considers Tocqueville's Democracy in America. Topics include the relationship between aristocracy and democracy; the instability of democracy; the antidotes to these instabilities; the significance of habit in Tocqueville's thought; the case for American Exceptionalism; and the importance of religion for democracy.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5330C. Party Systems in Latin America.

The course examines some key insights in party and party system theory and practice. Latin America is the regional referent for examining these themes, and country examples are studied in considerable depth to illustrate the theory.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5330D. Problems in Political Science: International Humanitarian Affairs.

This course inquires into the intellectual legacy of international humanitarian issues, including forced migration, refugee problems, moral issues related to humanitarian intervention and emergency aid issues.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5330E. Religion and American Political Culture.

An examination of the ways in which religious beliefs and institutions have shaped American political culture; the ways in which American culture has influenced these beliefs and institutions; and the ongoing debates regarding the proper role of religion in American public life.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing|Topics
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5332. Problems in American Foreign Relations.

This course is a seminar based on selected topics in American foreign policy and United States involvement in international relations.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5334. Texas Politics.

This course examines some of the traditional debates over federalism, intergovernmental relations, and different ways people compare the states. It introduces Texas political institutions and its political history as well as examines some of the current Texas public policy questions such as education, criminal justice, and economic development.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5335. The Role of Interests in America.

This course examines the role of interest groups and other organizations in the United States. Students learn about the range of social and economic interests presently active in our country and what observers from a variety of perspectives believe this activity implies for the health of our political system.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5336. Property, Liberty, and Popular Sovereignty.

This course examines the role, status, and power of property in demographic societies. It takes a modified historical approach to the subject, tracing attitudes regarding property from before the American Revolution until today. Although the emphasis is on the United States, the course reviews property in other societies where appropriate.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5337. American Political Culture.

This course explores selected problems related to American political culture with particular emphasis on the question of the cultural preconditions of free government. Beginning with Alexis de Tocqueville's classic study of American political culture, the course explores different Tocquevillian themes in a contemporary American context.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5338. American Political Discourse.

This class identifies the way political discourse and social and political cultures connect within Americans' minds. Diverse theoretical perspectives will be used to explore the phenomena involved in social and political issues regarding values, meanings, norms, and prejudices and methods of improving political discourse within American political culture.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5339. The American Presidency.

The course entails an historical analysis of presidential elections from 1789 to the present day. In addition, students examine and engage in reasonable speculations about the upcoming elections.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5340. Congress and the Legislative Process.

This course examines the American legislative process with a focus on Congress. The framework for the course is based on three themes: 1) the "dual Congress," i.e., the notions of deliberation versus representation; 2) the distribution of power in Congress and its consequences; and 3) the bicameral nature of Congress.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5341. Seminar in Constitutional Law and Theory.

This course examines selected issues in constitutional theory, including the theory of judicial review, and constitutional interpretation. It examines the debate on constitutional interpretation in light of cases dealing with the First Amendment freedom of speech, press, and religion, and with substantive due process and the equal protection clause.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5356. The British Political Order Since 1900.

This course examines British policy from 1901 to the present and the major events that affected British history and politics.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5357. Russian Politics and Josef Stalin.

This course examines Josef Stalin's personal and public life, analyzes his accomplishments and failures, and generates a summative assessment of his impact on Russian and global politics.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5358. Civil-Military Relations in Comparative Perspective.

This course is an intensive exploration of the subject of civil-military relations. Students critically examine the primary positive and normative theories of civil-military relations. They also investigate the state of civil-military relations in the United States and around the globe.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5359. Comparative Democratization.

This course examines the inner workings of autocracies and democracies in the developing world, as well as processes of regime transitions.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5360. Economic Development in Developing Nations.

This course examines some of the factors that account for economic development/underdevelopment in developing nations. The factors examined include political, economic and institutional variables. These underlying variables reveal the multi-causal nature of socio-economic development.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5361. Government and Politics of African States.

This course examines governments and politics of African states. It examines the nature of domestic and international politics, the precolonial politics and political culture, the impact of the colonial period on politics, several cases of post-colonial successes and failures, the critical nature of external involvement in the politics, and the settings of civil war.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5362. Problems of Democracy in Latin America.

This course examines the main structural and institutional obstacles that stand in the way of high quality democracy in Latin America.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5363. Party Systems in Latin America.

The course examines some key insights in party and party system theory and practice. Latin America is the regional referent for examining these themes, and country examples are studied in considerable depth to illustrate the theory.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5375. Seminar in International Relations Theory.

This course is designed to engage students in the major theoretical and conceptual traditions of international relations in order to assess the complex issues, developments and events constituting international politics.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5377. Problems in International Organizations.

This course analyzes the structure, functions, and role of the international organizations in the international system. The course addresses the role of international regions, regional organizations, functional agencies, and bilateral organizations. The procedures and processes on international argument and policy-making are studied through participation in a model security council.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5378. Problems in International Law.

This course examines the nature, functions, and scope, of international law. It addresses several major areas including legal sources, diplomatic practice, territorial jurisdiction, legal personality, the law of state responsibility, asylum law, human rights, and the law of war. The course is heavily research oriented and includes moot court arbitration.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5379. Problems in International Political Economy.

This course examines theories and issues in international political economy. The course emphasizes the political and economic conditions conducive to the development of cooperative international economic behavior among countries.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5380. International Conflict and Security.

This course deals with the field of security studies. Security studies focuses on what Clausewitz famously called "politics by other means": war. This course centers on three enduring topics: the causes of war, the use of force, and the future of warfare.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5389. Internship in Government.

This course offers students practical experience in the on-going work of a selected governmental unit. The student is evaluated on the basis of a research paper, work journal, and work performance. The approval of the graduate program director is required. It may be repeated once with different emphasis and with a maximum of 6 credit hours.

3 Credit Hours. 0 Lecture Contact Hours. 20 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5390. Political Science Curriculum Development.

This course is designed for graduate students with a social science teacher emphasis who are interested in teaching dual credit courses on federal or state government. The course focuses on practical teaching matters including, construction of syllabi, delivering effective lectures, teaching formats, test construction, and grading practices Prerequisite: Department Approval Needed. Corequisite: Completed 18 graduate hours in Political Science.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5391. Political Science Teaching Practicum.

This course is designed for graduate students with a social science teacher emphasis who are interested in teaching dual credit courses. Prerequisite: PS 5390 with a minimum grade of “B”; Department Approval Required.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5398. Directed Reading and Research.

This course is an advanced reading and/or research on various topics in political science under the direction of a graduate faculty member. It may be repeated once with different emphasis and professor for a maximum of 6 credit hours. The approval of the graduate program director is required.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PS 5399A. Thesis.

This course represents a student's initial thesis enrollment. No thesis credit is awarded until a student has completed the thesis under a Political Science Thesis B course. Approval of the graduate program director is required.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

PS 5399B. Thesis.

This course represents a student's continuing thesis enrollments. The student continues to enroll in a Thesis B course until the thesis is submitted for binding. Prerequisite: PS 5399A with a grade of PR. The approval of the graduate program director is required.

3 Credit Hours. 3 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

PS 5599B. Thesis.

This course represents a student's continuing thesis enrollments. The student continues to enroll in a Thesis B course until the thesis is submitted for binding.

5 Credit Hours. 5 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit

PS 5999B. Thesis.

This course represents a student's continuing thesis enrollments. The student continues to enroll in a Thesis B course until the thesis is submitted for binding.

9 Credit Hours. 9 Lecture Contact Hours. 0 Lab Contact Hours.
Course Attribute(s): Exclude from 3-peat Processing
Grade Mode: Credit/No Credit